Oscars producers speak out about host-less show

Donna Gigliotti and Glenn Weiss open up about how they're "really happy with how the show ended up" in an exclusive interview with "GMA."
3:15 | 02/21/19

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Transcript for Oscars producers speak out about host-less show
We're back with our countdown to the oscars. The big show three days away and T.J. Is in Hollywood getting behind the scenes secrets from the producers themselves. Good morning, T.J. Reporter: Hey, good morning to you, robin. These producers will admit all the headlines and controversy boil down to two thing, ratings and run time. How do we get the ratings up and run time down. How do we do this by broadening to a younger audience and at the same time staying true to 90-year oscars traditions? There might not be a host but there won't be any shortage of star P on that stage. Just three days away from what's already been a controversial show, I call up with the producers who addressed rumors and speculation running rampant. There's a lot of things floating around out there. We're here over the week between nominations and show building a show and we're happy with the show. Is queen going open this thing? Yes. ??? We will, we will rock you ??? Reporter: Legendary rock band featured in the Oscar nominated "Bohemian rhapsody" is among the major musical acts set to take the stage. The purchases also aggressed their disappointment at the backlash after the academy initially said awards in four categories including cinematography would be handed out during commercial breaks. Were you surprised by the backlash of taking the four categories out? A little bit insofar as no one actually would have -- we had such a good edit on it, nobody would have really noticed it. It was painful for us to see that kind of backlash. Reporter: Keeping the show on time is a major concern. We've asked that people stick to the 90-second rule which is from the time their name is called to the time they exit the stage. How strict are you going to be. If you're very strict the moment like the one he gave us on live TV would not have happened. Will you marry me? Yes. Oscars producer Glenn Weiss is the Glenn Weiss who gave us that memorable moment from last year's emmys when he received an award and handed out a ring. Our main purpose is to honor those people on the stage. So that's the main purpose but also, guys, last year's show was 3 hours and 53 minutes. The longest oscars in history was 4 hours and 23 minutes. That was in 2002 but get this, the shortest in history was 15 minutes back in 1929, George, you would have loved that one. They're trying to find some kind of happy medium, something in between. Looking for a sweet spot and I asked specifically will you hit that three-hour mark and they gave me a firm we'll try. A firm we'll try. 15 minutes. What were they doing speed reading? Wasn't it the first one, T.J.? There were only three films that year. 1929, the first one and, George, you wouldn't have even made it through your first beer. Keep having a good time out there, T.J. Keep out of trouble. Thank you. Thank you so much. You can see the oscars, where? Right here on ABC. 8:00 P.M. Eastern on Sunday. That's right. Coming up, the high school

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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