Gingrich Hints at '08 Run for President

Former Republican Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich hinted Tuesday that he may enter the 2008 presidential race.

Gingrich said on "Good Morning America" that he will take a look at his resources after he completes a series of workshops for his new advocacy group American Solutions.

"Next Monday, my good friend and adviser Randy Evans will have a press conference and will outline a process for us to spend the next few weeks finding out whether or not there are enough resources to wage a serious campaign," Gingrich said.

At a breakfast in Washington last week Gingrich said that he wanted to raise $30 million by November.

"I'm not going to try to get into a race where Gov. Romney can write a personal check for $100 million as a middle-class candidate if we can't find a way to raise money and to be competitive," Gingrich said Tuesday on "GMA."

He didn't say when he would make an announcement, but he called Nov. 13, when Ronald Reagan announced his candidacy in 1979, a "propitious" date, according to The Associated Press.

Gingrich has praised former Tennessee Sen. Fred Thompson and former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, but today seemed to indicate they weren't ready to take on Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-N.Y.

Gingrich said he was at a Republican conference over the weekend where "an amazing amount of people walked up to me and said they want somebody who can debate Sen. Clinton, who can go toe to toe and debate the kind of changes we need in America. So I'm prepared to try to."

Gingrich is also working hard to make a break from the Bush administration and said the country needs a change.

"If you go to YouTube you'll see a 3 1/2 minute video called 'FedEx vs. American Democracy.' It gives you a sense of the scale of change I believe in," Gingrich said.

Sounding very much the candidate, Gingrich cited six examples of "dramatic change" he would make.

"Levees shouldn't fail, bridges should not fall, school should actually educate, the border should be controlled," he said. "English should be the official language of government. Congress should not spend more than it has."