Civil rights activist Tamika D. Mallory talks ‘State of Emergency’

Mallory, who went viral with her speech following the killing of George Floyd, takes a look at America today and what impact activism can have on the future.
4:20 | 05/18/21

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Transcript for Civil rights activist Tamika D. Mallory talks ‘State of Emergency’
She made waves last year for speaking out at a press conference following the death of George Floyd. Black people are in a state of emergency. We are in a state of emergency. Black folks, in America. And those who support us need to understand the depth of the state of emergency, and it didn't just start today. But it is at a critical point. We are at a point when folks, grandmothers, all the way down to little babies are tired. People realize that this attack that we are under, I heard someone saying on TV today that it feels like every black person in America is being hunted. It's been almost a year now since civil rights activist Tamika Mallory delivered that powerful speech. Not only did she declare a state of emergency then but in her first book, "State of emergency." Tamika Mallory, it is good to see you. How you doing young lady. Thank you so much for having me on. We saw that clip. Lot of people will remember it. And your face and your voice has been prominent over the past year but you talk about black folks being in a state of emergency now. Some might ask, well, when were we not in a state of emergency. What do you mean at a critical time? I think I also say it is a critical moment. And I think what makes it critical is that people have decided that we're not going sit by and continue to allow these things that we're feeling and these really terrible incidents and obviously other folks from outside of our communities are beginning to see and understand it and have also become a part of an uprising. I think we are at a boiling point, where we see cities burning. It reminds me of other times in history where we've had similar incidents which really meant that there had to be some level of change. And I think we're in a space now where it feels almost like some want to take us back, when we're not even as far forward as we should be. But certainly in this moment we're going to have to push past this particular time and make sure there is some accountability or else I fear what will happen in this country. There was some accountability there with the murder of George Floyd. Derek chauvin found guilty on all counts. Surely that was a victory. But where do we go from there? What still needs to happen now? Well, certainly, there should not be complacency because of one verdict and one family receiving some form of accountability. We also have a trial coming up for the other three individuals who were there, officers, who stood by and did nothing. And that reminds me very much of the issue that we have with police departments in general. That we are always told, there is constantly this narrative that all police are not bad. All police are not bad apples but too many are standing by doing nothing while our people are being murdered, while people are being harmed and abused. And I think that in this moment, where we see, you know, as we have a new administration in office, things have sort of changed in terms of the political power within this country. It is the time for us to really push the gas and force this administration to do what for some may feel difficult, it may even feel impossible. But it is possible if people make a statement and a decision to be -- and not to fold and allow compromise to get in the way of true progress. You have been tireless from the moment I have met you. And you keep at it. So it is good to see you here. I know we'll see you down the road and congratulations on the book. You know how much I love and appreciate you, and it is good to see you as well. Thank you all so much. All right, Tamika, thank you. And folks, you can get "State of emergency: How we win in the country we built," available everywhere books are sold and she's within at it. Nonstop from the moment I met

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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