Philadelphia mayor: Listen to science, not politics to stop coronavirus

Mayor Jim Kenney talks about the importance of wearing masks, getting all school kids connected for remote learning and more.
3:09 | 08/05/20

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Transcript for Philadelphia mayor: Listen to science, not politics to stop coronavirus
Now to Philadelphia, where tropical storm Isaias pummelled the city yesterday, downing power lines and spawning tornadoes. Meanwhile on the upside, once a virus hot spot, philly is starting to see slight drops in its covid-19 numbers. We're joined by the Philadelphia mayor Jim Kenney. Mayor Kenney, thanks for being with us. And even though the storm is gone we know that flooding continued overnight into this morning affecting your commute. How is Philadelphia doing? We're doing well. Our emergency management people have done a terrific job of getting ahead of the story. We have had some tidal flooding over creeks due to rainfall, that's all receded, and we've had no real injuries or loss of life. That's certainly good news. And there's some other good news. It appears right now that your city is moving in the right direction, slowing the spread of the virus, but what are you doing to keep those numbers going down? I think the most important thing to recognize in this whole unprecedented thing that we're going through in this country, and around the world, is that you have to listen to the medicine. You have to listen to the science, you can't allow the science to be impacted by the politics. And I think that's the biggest mistake that this country's made and the biggest mistake that the president and governments have done, allowed the politics to affect the science. And the other thing is, this is the easiest, cheapest and most effective way for us to come back from this pandemic. And I think back to the days of World War II and the sacrifices that people made to get us through World War II. We're only asking people to wear a mask, that's it, and if you can do that you'll have success. You'll stay safe. Mayor, you just made Dr. Jen nod and smile at the same time. She's in full agreement with you. School year about to start. Students will begin this year with virtual classes, how are you addressing the concerns the challenges this may pose for low-income students, people who don't have internet access, or the computers they need to do this successfully. We have 200,000 students in both our public and charter 35,000 of our students have no access at all. We're working with Comcast and a number of philanthropic sources to get these children, to get them wired, to get the equipment that they need to get online. We're going to be virtual to at least November 17th and we have to make sure that everybody's plugged in, we've lost a number of months last year, last spring with our children and we can't let them fall behind. It's the biggest economic impact that we could have to educate our children, if our children aren't educated they'll remain in poverty. It's a big job for us to get done. Philadelphia mayor Jim Kenney, thank you so much for joining us today. We appreciate your time. Thank you. Wear a mask. We certainly will. Thank you for that important reminder.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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