Federal workers react to short-term funding deal

How long will it take to pay the furloughed workers?
3:41 | 01/26/19

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Transcript for Federal workers react to short-term funding deal
government workers hoping their first paychecks in more than a month will come quickly. But some are concerned they'll be back in the same position when funding runs out again in just three weeks. ABC's erielle reshef has more on what federal workers are saying this morning. We have reached a deal. Reporter: A collective sigh of relief from more federal workers. We get to go back to work. The end to the longest partial government shutdown in U.S. History. We need to get paid. Reporter: A temporary reprieve but that February 15th deadline looming for a so far elusive compromise on border security. Giving us a temporary solution is not really beneficial to us. Sure, they'll open it long enough to pay us our back pay but then we're still dealing with uncertainties going forward. Reporter: The three-week agreement to get government employees back to work hardly leaving a sense of long-term security. Crystal Kirkpatrick has worked for the irs for five years. I donate plasma to make up the extra money I don't make. I'm not going to quit my section job yet because I don't know if this is a band-aid or a solution. Reporter: Ryan Baugh works for immigration services. But as he plans to head back to work, Baugh says he's asking himself, what for? I think all of us are asking ourselves right now, is this a job that we can rely on? Is this a job that has our back like we have its back? Reporter: A senior administration official says specific payroll issues may vary by agency. Government workers are urged to contact their employers about paycheck information. Dan, federal employees should receive backpay, but contractors paid by private companies to work for the government may not. That's really painful and so poignant to hear that one federal employee wondering allow whether this is a job he can count on. Let's bring in ABC's Matthew dowd who is your chief political analyst. He joins us from Texas this morning. Matthew, do these federal workers have reason to be concerned about another shutdown coming up in just a few weeks? Given how much heat the president took for this one, do you think he'd be willing to pull the trigger again? You know, Dan, Hollywood doesn't Normal make a sequel after a bomb at the box office but they've done it before. I think of "Deuce bigalow" where they made a sequel of "Deuce bigalow." The president, it would be a good time for reflection and realize that doing it again is not going to help him but with this president you never know what he's going to do and whether or not he'll step in it one more time. You left out "Benji, the hunted," that was one of my favorites. Politically are there clear winners and losers in the story in your view? Absolutely, you couldn't be more crystal clear. First on the loser, the big loser in this is the president. First of all, he shut the government down putting 800,000 workers without getting paid. His poll numbers dropped. He united the Democrats and so I think in this the big loser is the president. The big winner obviously the 800,000 workers who will get paid now, but also Nancy Pelosi. She's established herself as a dominant force and I think a big winner in this broadly is the fact that people now look at this and understand government matters. The services that government provides matter. When you don't have them, things in the country begin to go awry so I think Nancy Pelosi and actually the institutions of government are the winners in this. Matthew dowd joining us from Texas, Matthew, thank you very much. What was that statistic we are were talking about? The fact that 6 billion, it was estimated now, has been lost because of the government shutdown and the president wanted 5.7 billion. We were just wondering whether or not which side would benefit from that stat line the most, promoting that. Yeah. Probably nobody. Exactly. That's where we are right now.

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