Police mistakenly swarm car of young Black woman

The incident has sparked controversy for the way police in Aurora, Colorado, handled approaching the woman, Brittany Gilliam, and her family.
2:21 | 08/05/20

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Transcript for Police mistakenly swarm car of young Black woman
that was caught on camera, police mistakenly swarming the car of a young black woman with her family, a lot of anger this morning about how this was handled by a police department that has had issues in the past. A warning that the video is difficult to watch. Clayton Sandell has that story for us. Reporter: The sounds of children handcuffed face down on the pavement. I want to get up. Reporter: Prompting a new investigation after Aurora, Colorado, police mistakenly believed they found a stolen car driven by Brittany Gilliam. To hear four kids scream my name like that is the most heartbreaking thing ever. Reporter: She said without warning officers pointed guns at her, her 6-year-old daughter, 12-year-old sister and two teenage nieces. We're not the criminals here. I can understand if you just drew your gun at me as the adult here and said, listen, ma'am, I'm going to draw my gun at you, because you're more likely to have stolen the vehicle but the way you did your job with the kids. Reporter: Here's how police explain. In Aurora automated license plate riders at intersections check for stolen cars. On Sunday the system alerted dispatchers that her car was stolen but in reality her car shares a license plate number with the real stolen vehicle, a motorcycle from Montana. The mistake is that the officer was going off what dispatch told them. It was confirmed so he was acting in good faith. The officer started doing investigation on his own to look into the computer and found it was not -- it was not listed as a stolen vehicle. Reporter: She says she doesn't want an apology but wants Aurora police to do better. The whole point of you being police officers is to protect and serve for the people. You did not protect and serve. It's unacceptable. Any way I try to see it. Reporter: Three Aurora cops fired and one quit after posing for pictures making fun of the chokehold used on Elijah Mcclain. He died after this encounter. He committed no crime. Gilliam tells me she believes she and her family might have been treated differently if they weren't black. Aurora P.D. Has apologized and says they are reviewing policies and training, Amy. All right, Clayton Sandell, thank you so much for that.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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