Demo shows how fast germs move amid flu season

It doesn’t take much for the influenza virus to spread, which the New England Patriots saw firsthand after eight players missed practice this week with flu-like symptoms.
3:10 | 11/29/19

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Transcript for Demo shows how fast germs move amid flu season
We're back to talk about the flu season which is now in full swing. We were talking about this with the super bowl champion new England patriots. They had several members of that team, eight actually missed practice this week because of the flu but it doesn't party if you are in a locker room or a classroom. Those places are good spots to spread those nasty influenza germs. Oh. You see those bright spots? Those could be germs. Look at yours. They're all over these kids. You have it all in your hair. The genre we talked about yesterday. Reporter: Just a few hours earlier not a trace. "Gma" teamed up with miss shaftman's fifth grade class at southwest Chicago Christian school to demonstrate how rapidly they spread. We use glo germ and pulled these two students out of class. Look what happens. It comes on me. We follow the students' every move and less than a minute we see Aidan touch the water fountain. The water fountain a popular spot for students. One stud de tells us up to 2.7 bacteria per square inch are on the spigot. It has more than 800 times the amount found on a toilet seat. And essentially is now ground zero for the spread of the powder. Once in the classroom both Aidan and Mckenzie use this smart board pen that every single kid in class touches. After an hour I head into the classroom while the kids are at recess to check for signs of the he feel like a crime scene investigator. The pen is covered in powder. The students move on to the library and reapply the glo germ. Next they go to music then back to their classroom where they don't know what's coming. Hello, everybody. My name is T.J. Holmes and I am a correspondent with the show called "Good morning America." We check the students. 8 of the 26 students in the class not including Aidan and Mckenzie have spots on their hands and faces. Your ears. And desks and chairs. Which miss shaftman says is a hard lace to keep clean. Now the kids tell us they'll be more careful. Wash more thoroughly and make sure you're not touching anyone. No, we're not touching hands, man. It's a very simple thing. Have you had your flu shots. Yes. Not yet no. I know. I haven't either. The simple things, we talk about washing hands an sanitizers but you got to wash. Wash your hands Ando it thoroughly. A lot of kids, I got a 6-year-old at the house, a little bit of this, no, take your time and teach them to sing the happy birthday song and don't spend all day touching your face. Don't touch your nose, mouth, eyes. Disinfect everything. Especially in the apartment and house. The kids touch everything. They do and they're just nasty. They're just nasty. The germs, not the kids. Sure. Well, coming up, the new

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