Eating more processed foods could increase your cancer risk, study says

Nutritionist Maya Feller discusses what to know about a new study that links eating more processed foods to a significant increase in your risk of developing certain cancers.
3:42 | 02/16/18

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Transcript for Eating more processed foods could increase your cancer risk, study says
cancer. Eating 10% more of what's known as ultra processed foods is associated with a significant increase in overall cancer risk and so Jen Ashton is here and nutritionist highy feller is here. It showed that people who ate highly processed foods had a 10% higher risk of all types of cancer, sorry, if they ate 10% more of this ultra processed foods in their diet, 12% overall risk in cancer and 11% increased risk in Brett Eldridge cancer. It's important to read between the lines here. Number one, we talk about relative risk videotape ABC absolute risk. You want to know how many more cases of breast cancer, the study did not break that down and this study was based on association, not cause and effect and until we can connect those dots we have to interpret the results with caution. Big difference. All that being said sometimes we don't -- we think we're doing the right thing and don't realize it's ultra processed. One of the things I want to say, ultra processed is processed food added sugars, salt, fillers, gums, added colors and flavors like these fruity yogurt drinks or soda and energy drink with lots of color. Some might be surprising, packaged muffand baked goodies. Deli meats. Instant soup. Anything with a shelf life for a long period of time? That's always a sign. That's why organic expires so quickly but it's better for you. All right, so tell us why these types of foods could be linked to cancer. In the study they didn't explain that from a biologic stand the point but there are theories. It's a long list. These foods tend to be less nutritious overall and tend to have like Maya was saying a ton of food additives. They are packaged and they are processed so whether I tell my patients, what Maya tells her client eat from the farm, not the factory. If you can't recognize it as its true food form, that's a clue. Eat from the farm, not the factory, y'all. Eat from the farm, not the fa factory, y'all. It's so cheap and convenient. What are ways to save money and time in one of the things I always tell people shop the perimeter of the grocery store where you find your fresh goods and get to know your food and know your nutrition facts label and need to identify what is whole and minimally processed in comparison to what is ultra processed. The other thing, get back to your kitchen, cook at home. You know what I mine. I understand people are busy, what you can do is buy plea cut meats and vegetables. Shortcuts. Just not have the add tiffs that the ultra processed foods are. It's okay to try prepared foods at the grocery tore like drilled chicken or vij tables. Ette ier salads will legumes will be filled with vitamins, fiber and minerals. I got my lunch right here I was going to say. Thank you very much. Have a good weekend.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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