Controversial Parenting Trend 'Redshirting' Used to Give Kindergarteners an Advantage in Sports

Parents wanting their young athletes to excel in sports are keeping their kids out of kindergarten an extra year to gain an edge over smaller, younger students.
3:13 | 05/20/15

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Transcript for Controversial Parenting Trend 'Redshirting' Used to Give Kindergarteners an Advantage in Sports
All of us parents will do what we can to help our kids get a good start in life. For some, that means holding your kids back. Having them repeat a year in school to get a better start at sports. It's called red-shirting. Some say holding kids back is taking things a bit too far. A look at the fascinating story we got from our friends at ESPN "Outside the lines." The NFL's number one draft pick, jam miswip son, chosen by the Tampa bay buccaneer, famously red-shirted in college. Sacked at the 30 yard line by the freshman corner, Brian fields. Reporter: That guy tackling him, Brian fields, he also red shirted. According to a report by ESPN's jt outside the line" fields didn't do it in college. He did it in eighth grade. Take out the athletic part of it, if we say, we repeetd eighth grade because he struggled in math. No one would have a problem with it. You throw sports into it, some people have a problem with it. What we looked at was, you get very few opportunities in life that you can manufacture time. We were in a position and had the opportunity to give him another year to work toward achieving his goal. Reporter: The trend of redshirting in grade school is happening more and more. Parents gaming the system so their kids can have a competitive edge. This little leaguer in west Virginia held back by his dad. Got everything, helmet, glove, right? Yep, it's in the bag. Reporter: Troy Anthony repeated kindergarten. The boy's future as an athlete was key. It was a big factor. I would be lying if I said it wasn't. One concern about redshirting, it sets a precedent for a did play's puts pressure on them to do something they might not want to do. I hate to be cast as a sports villain, you know what I mean. If he chooses to be a participant in sports and wants to pursue, we want to give him an opportunity to excel in sports. I think that I have done that so far. Reporter: Sports professionals are not convinced it gives an advantage. If you're the smallest one, you have to be faster. That might teach you how to be a suatrior hlete. A better athlete. A better player. If you're always the biggest player, there's not as much impetus for you to make those creative solutions. Reporter: And there are other things to consider as well. A study done by researchers at Texas and usc finds that kids who redshirted for any reason, were twice as likely to drop out of high school. That's huge. Back in the day, if kids were going the get bet, they played up. That paradigm is completely shifted. I never heard that. A lot more dancing ahead.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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