'Walking Dead' Co-Creator Files $280M Lawsuit Against AMC

The "GMA" team of insiders analyze some of the biggest stories trending this morning.
6:38 | 09/30/16

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Transcript for 'Walking Dead' Co-Creator Files $280M Lawsuit Against AMC
Oh, it's time now for our big board. Our team of experts standing by live. You know it's a big board when T.J. Is right here. A huge "Walking dead" lawsuit. Co-creator frank derabont was fired in season two. Now he's filed a suit against AMC, claims he's entitled to profits from the show, seeking whopping damages. Give us a number. The man helped create one of the biggest shows on TV. He just wants a small pittance for his trouble. What is a pittance? $280 million. A quarter billion dollars this man is asking for. He says he's ode it. Frank derabont is the name. You might not know it. Wrote it, produced it, directed it. Season two, they let him go. Did they give a reason? Not much. He thinks part of the reason is, if he went through the second season, there were certain profits he was owed. They got rid of him early. Sounds like he might have a case. How big of a ratings shut this? He's asking for $200-something million, how much does the show make? No matter how much it's making, he argues it's not making as much as it could. Something called vertical independent gags. Neatwork produces a show, sells it, licenses it to itself at a lower rate to keep the profits down and margins down for people they might have to owe like frank. He says funny business is going on here. Whatever Texas instruments calculator he's using to figure out the profits are higher than the network says. This is going on for five years. Probably won't go to trial for 2018. My calculator doesn't have that many Numbers on it. All right. We'll keep our eye on that one. Now to a snapchat sexting case. An Iowa teen and her family filing a lawsuit. The teen sent suggestive photos to a classmate. We have Becky here? No, sunny. Sunny there you are. Becky got nervous. Sunny, you're here. Okay, the family attorney says that T the prosecutor basically is trying the shame their daughter about her noncriminal behavior. Is that true? Tell us about the case. You have a 14-year-old girl who is the high school freshman. She sends two photos to a boy who encouraged her to send the photos. One photo, Michael, is of her in a sports bra and some boy shorts. The other photo, she is topless with the same boy shorts. But her hair is covering her breasts. Prosecutors got hold of these in an investigation of sexting at the high school. They're threatening to charge her are child pornography. That would make her register as a sex offender. T.j. Is shaking his head. Oh, lord. I think you have talked about this before, sunny. Does this type -- does it cast too wide of a net? Legal experts feel that way. I think so. We have talked about this in the sense that it takes law a long time to catch up with technology. The bottom line is, a lot of children are sending these sexting messages. They're committing suicide because they're being bullied at school. Other kids are sending them between themselves. That's teenage behavior. I'll show you mine if you show me yours. Prosecutors are trying to balance this. The better course, education. Main community service. But child pornography charges? I don't think so. Zplefr time you said that, T.J., you're wiping your brow. I'm with you. It's scary when you have young kids, boy or girl. It's what they do. It's what they do. It's scary. It's scary out there. All right, sunny, thank you. Now to the backlash over gender bias in the work place. A male venture capitalist writing in "The Wall Street journal" that women in tech should hide their gender when launching startups to get ahead. We'll talk to Becky. Our tech guru. You got a raise to lawyer a moment ago. Refer to me as B.W., and no picture to let you know I'm a woman. It could affect the audience's value to affect what I'm saying. Come on. That's a good point you just made. I'm quoing what this guy wrote. If your linkedin profile, use your initials or unisex name and E eliminate photos. This guy is an investor in startup. He's saying that implicit bias in women in tech snolg so strong, they should hide their identities if they want equal treatment. What? The backlash is fierce. John Greathouse has posted one of the fastest apologies in gender bias. Saying I told them to endure it, rath eer than fix it. It does exist. This keeps getting worse. It's not only about tech. Author J.K. Rowling used a gender-neutral name because she didn't want the alienate male readers. I didn't know that's why she did it. I thought she was channeling J.R.R. Tolkien. The author points to orchestras. Traditionally 95% male. Started blind auditions, boom, women came in when conductors got to choose just on musicians. That's what the conversation should be about. The subject is our work product. All people should be included. What you to think, sunny? I just can't believe it. The bottom line is, women, men, it's who is the best for the position, right? Exactly. Quality of work. Is that why you go by T.J.? You mow my first name. You know why I go by T.J. He's gt an interesting first name. Come on, say it. Tell people, T.J. Some, robin. What is it? It's loutelious. "Gma" will be right back. All right. Thank you, Becky. Thank you, sunny. Thank you, T.J. Gilman: Go get it, Marcus. Go get it.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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