YouTube star under fire issues emotional apology

Logan Paul apologized after posting a video apparently showing someone who took their own life.
7:23 | 01/03/18

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Transcript for YouTube star under fire issues emotional apology
we'll begin with that emotional apology from YouTube star Logan Paul after he posted a video apparently showing someone who took their own life. This morning calls are growing for his channel to be shut down and ABC's Adrienne Bankert is here with more on all this. Good morning, Adrienne. Good morning to you. Yes, wildly popular on YouTube with millions of kids watching all of his videos, endorsement deals from Pepsi and HBO but this morning, Logan Paul is facing more backlash for his latest video. I've made a severe and continuous lapse in my judgment and I don't expect to be forgiven. I'm simply here to apologize. Reporter: In a stark change of tone from his usually comedic videos YouTube star Logan Paul says he's ashamed of his actions. For my fans who are defending my actions, please don't. They do not deserve to be defended. Reporter: The social media influencer with more than 15 million YouTube subscribers. Ow. Reporter: Faces intense criticism after posting a video he shot in what's known as Japan's suicide forest where he shows the body of a person who recently killed themselves. Many reacting to the fact that Paul makes jokes throughout the video. Parents whose kids watch his hugely popular channel are outraged. One tweet reads, the worst part is Logan Paul's cult fan base is little children. Who just watched their idol laugh and joke as someone ended their life. He's a complete and utter insensitive idiot. The fierce backlash prompted him to take down the video. This morning many question why YouTube which told ABC news it prohibits violent or gory content posted in a shocking, sensational or disrespectful manner didn't remove the video immediately. I think that YouTube was probably blind sided. Reporter: YouTube says a billion videos are uploaded every day announcing in December the company would have 10,000 employees monitor content after deleting over 150,000 videos deemed disturbing or featuring predatory comments just the month before. It follows efforts to monitor what people can broadcast on Facebook, whichaunched a review last April after it took over two hours to take down a video of a murder. As for Paul, many want his channel shut down. You have to violate their community standards three times in order to be kicked off YouTube but there is really no such thing as permanently banning someone from the platform. They might lose their subscribers but there's nothing stopping them from opening another account. Reporter: YouTube has told us our hearts go to out to the family of that victim. They were mentioning exactly what so many wondered was, you know, who was this man? Who was the body that was shown in the video? But you have to have a certain stipulation to violate those terms of service enough for them to shut down your account, of course, repeated violation of the community rules or the terms of service and also anything that would incite hatred or violence, harassment, identity theft with something that was a large violation and many wondering if any of the things that Logan did would cause them to shut his site down. Have we heard from other YouTube stars. One major stars saying he should put his money where his mouth is and saying that if he really did want to help because we talked about him laughing in the video, kind of awkwardly, a little uncomfortable, that if he really wants to help those who are the victims of feelings that could lead to suicide, he should make a contribution to a charitable cause that fights suicide and fights -- pursues suicide prevention. That would be a step in the right direction. We bring in Rebecca Jarvis. How important is he to YouTube? Hugely important and he's one of many of these YouTube stars that is hugely important. 15 million subscribers. He's been making a 15-minute video a day getting 300 million views a month and he's making somewhere between $12 million and $15 million off these YouTube posts from both the advertising revenue and all of the people who are looking at this, young people pry may already looking at these YouTube videos. Are you surprised YouTube hasn't taken action. I'm not surprised because I think that we're in a whole new world right now. I think that YouTube is right now trying to figure out what its position is. They have their community stand dards but they're somewhat murky and as we heard from Adrienne what's interesting is now the YouTube stars themselves are the ones who are speaking out in this whole new world that we've entered into where pretty much anyone, frankly, anyone can go out and post a video online today and it takes a while for the community to have a reaction to that video and then have some sort of response to that. For YouTube to not even be the ones to take it down, it was Logan Paul, his choice to do that, how do you monitor? It's so difficult. It's very difficult, I mean, they have a safety mode, parents can use a safety mode on YouTube and we can walk people through exactly the steps to do that but I think also this requires conversations with families and it's not easy. You can monitor this on your home computer, for example, in that safety mode if you go on the parent can activate safety mode by clicking that blue sign so where you login to your Google account or your YouTube account you click on that sign in the upper right-hand corner and scroll , the bottom there is a safety button there and you can click on lock safety mode on the browser, that way no one can sign in without a password on that particular computer. The issue here is this is so much more broad than one account or one computer. Obviously YouTube has its own terms and restricts and say if you're in the United States you have to be 13 or older to use YouTube but, again, this is a much bigger conversation than what parents can do. We had the conversation at home last night and the kids know that it's outrageous. They know just about everything he does is outrageous, that's part of the fun but they were horrified, I think, like so many others were by this, by actually, you know, watching Logan Paul go into that forest. This is graphic. One of the things people have not addressed yet is the fact that YouTube doesn't have to monitor a billion users like this. They know who their biggest stars are so the important thing to note would be to hold their biggest stars accountable and be monitoring those stars to let us know that they care enough about the content of these influencers put out there. Because they have so many subscribers and the one thing that he did say in his apology, he said that he understood that the young people are defending him. Like the young people who follow him were defending him where older people were outraged and he said, and he said you cannot defend this so even he is saying that. Even ee realizes -- He's owning up to it. It's great you had the conversation with your girls because in talking to some colleagues here, they went to their children and asked them and they were just like, kind of nonchalantly, yeah, I saw it but didn't know it until they asked their kids if they had seen that video. There is a desensitization when you see all of this content that -- That's a problem. People forget what's real and what's -- The kids think all of it is a joke. That's the thing. Thank you all. Thank you very much.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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