More answers to your COVID-19 questions

ABC News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jen Ashton on the increased likelihood of blood clots and the potential for COVID-19 antibodies to prevent future infection.
1:49 | 06/25/20

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Transcript for More answers to your COVID-19 questions
Don't you wish robach was here for this segment? Dr. Ashton here to answer your questions. Blood clots after testing positive for covid-19. We know, based out of Asia and Europe, people with severe covid-19 are prone to micro thrombotic events. Back to medical school. It means miniscule blood clots in the vessels all over your body. Depending on where they are, if it's to your heart, you could have heart problems. If it's to your kidneys, you could have kidney problems. We don't understand why. We see this in settings of infection and low blood oxygen level. Next question. Is there an increase in positive cases in people under 40 as some cases are reporting? Absolutely there is. We're seeing this across a lot of states in the sun belt. The good news even though people in their 20s, 30s and 40s getting sick with covid-19, they're not getting as seriously ill, necessarily requiring hospitalization. The theory is this is due to dropping your radar and your vigilance in terms of behavior. People thinking they're immune. They're getting sick. Any indication that the presence of covid-19 antibodies are preventing infection? Short term, yes. Long term, we don't know. Again, it's only been around about six months. There's a question about durability. We heard Dr. Fauci talk about that, not just with vaccine immunity, but also after natural infection. Other coronavirus three months, six months, maybe a year. If that's the case, T.J., this could be just the gift that keeps giving. We're still learning about it. Dr. Ashton, thank you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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