Courtesy Kaoru Utada
  • Action Figure Slideshow: Japan

    Action Figure Slideshow: Japan
    The "Omote 3D" exhibit in Tokyo creates miniature figurines, using 3D scanning and printing technology.
    Courtesy Kaoru Utada
  • Action Figure Slideshow: Japan

    Action Figure Slideshow: Japan
    The Mini-Me brings to life every wrinkle and every imperfection.
    Courtesy Kaoru Utada
  • Action Figure Slideshow: Japan

    Action Figure Slideshow: Japan
    A 3D replica of a girl celebrating her Coming of Age ceremony in Japan.
    Courtesy Kaoru Utada
  • Action Figure Slideshow: Japan

    Action Figure Slideshow: Japan
    Creative Director Naoki Ito explains how it all works. The hand-held scanner includes cameras that capture the shape and texture of the subject.
    Courtesy Kaoru Utada
  • Action Figure Slideshow: Japan

    Action Figure Slideshow: Japan
    The staff begins by scanning ABC News reporter Akiko Fujita's head. One accidental nod and the image appears distorted.
    Courtesy Kaoru Utada
  • Action Figure Slideshow: Japan

    Action Figure Slideshow: Japan
    ABC News' Akiko Fujita tries to stand still for 15 minutes, the amount of time required for the full body scan. The information is used to create a 4 to 8 inch figurine.
    Courtesy Kaoru Utada
  • Action Figure Slideshow: Japan

    Action Figure Slideshow: Japan
    Akiko Fujita's face comes to life on screen, where the 3D software processes all the images collected.
    Courtesy Kaoru Utada
  • Action Figure Slideshow: Japan

    Action Figure Slideshow: Japan
    Junji Tanigawa holds a miniature replica of himself with a poster of his figurine in the background.
    Courtesy Kaoru Utada