AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from Latin America, Caribbean

AP PHOTOS: Student and labor groups call for new protests in Colombia, while Mara the elephant is prepared for her move from Argentina to a sanctuary in Brazil and Central American migrants are hauled onto buses by Mexican national guardsmen

This photo gallery highlights some of the top news images made by Associated Press photographers in Latin America and the Caribbean that were published in the past week.

In Colombia, student and labor groups called for new protests as they hoped to reignite demonstrations against President Ivan Duque that brought thousands to the streets late last year with a wide range of grievances with his conservative government.

In Argentina, 55-year-old elephant Mara was being prepared to leave her enclosure and be moved to a special sanctuary in Brazil.

In Puerto Rico, anger erupted after an online blogger posted a live video of the warehouse in the southern coastal city of Ponce filled with water bottles, cots, baby food and other basic supplies that had apparently been sitting there since Hurricane Maria battered the U.S. territory in Sept. 2017.

In Panama, members of the Ngabe Bugle indigenous group in a jungle community were round up by lay preachers and tortured, beaten, burned and hacked with machetes to make them "repent their sins."

Chile continued to be roiled by continuing street protests since Oct. 18, when a student protest over a modest increase in subway fares turned into a much larger and broader movement with a long list of demands that largely focus on inequality.

In Colombia, five people were killed during a skirmish between illegal armed groups. Authorities say rebels with the former Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia operate in the area and may have been involved.

Across Bolivia, the government of interim President Jeanine Áñez is taking down statues, painting over murals, renaming soccer fields and stadiums, and trying to erase the legacy of ousted President Evo Morales, who governed this Andean country for more than 14 years as its first indigenous president.

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This gallery was curated by photographer Jorge Saenz. On Twitter: @jorgesaenzpy