Germany confirms 1st case of swine fever on its territory

Germany’s agriculture minister says the country's first case of African swine fever has been confirmed in a wild boar cadaver found near the Polish border

BERLIN -- Germany has confirmed the first case of African swine fever on its territory, after a wild boar cadaver found in the eastern state of Brandenburg tested positive, the country’s agriculture minister said Thursday.

African swine fever is usually deadly for pigs but doesn't affect humans. It has previously been confirmed in several European countries, leading to large-scale culls of wild boars and farmed pigs they have come into contact with.

The measures will include limiting the movement of people and vehicles out of the affected region, bans on farming and targeted culling of wild boars, she said.

German farmers had been dreading the arrival of swine fever, considered almost inevitable, because of the impact it will have on the pork industry.

Kloeckner said trade in German pork products to other European Union countries will continue for now. She didn't comment on a possible export ban to major markets elsewhere, such as China.

The head of the German Farmers Association expressed concern about the outbreak, noting that there is no vaccine available yet for the virus that causes African swine fever.

Both Poland and Hungary have reported over 3,000 cases of African swine fever this year.