Sydney braces for flash floods as rain disaster moves south

Sydney is preparing for dangerous flash flooding as population centers farther north begin a massive cleanup operation

ByThe Associated Press
March 02, 2022, 1:49 AM
A man uses an excavator to stack debris damaged by flood water in Lismore, Australia, Wednesday, March 2, 2022. Floodwaters are moving south into New South Wales from Queensland state in the worst disaster in the region since what was described as a
A man uses an excavator to stack debris damaged by flood water in Lismore, Australia, Wednesday, March 2, 2022. Floodwaters are moving south into New South Wales from Queensland state in the worst disaster in the region since what was described as a once-in-a-century event in 2011. (Jason O'Brien/AAP Image via AP)
The Associated Press

SYDNEY -- Sydney was preparing on Wednesday for dangerous flash flooding as population centers farther north began a massive cleanup operation after record floods that have claimed at least 14 lives along Australia’s east coast in recent days.

The torrential rain — as much as 20 centimeters (8 inches) — is forecast for Australia’s largest city and surrounding areas late Wednesday and early Thursday, Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology said.

“In the Sydney area, we have minor to major flood warnings current,” meteorologist Dean Narramore said.

In the New South Wales town of Lismore, 600 kilometers (370 miles) north of Sydney, a fourth death was confirmed on Wednesday as floodwaters drain from homes and searchers knock on doors.

The body of a man, aged in his 70s, was found ion a flooded apartment, a police statement said.

A man's body had been found floating in a main street earlier on Wednesday.

The population of 28,000 people was inundated when Wilsons River peaked Monday afternoon at its highest level since records began in 1880.

Authorities expect the death toll to rise in Lismore and its surrounding areas.

Dozens of suburbs remain flooded in Brisbane, Australia’s third-most populous city 750 kilometers (470 miles) north of Sydney, after the river that snakes through its center peaked on Monday.

The Queensland state capital had received 80% of its average annual rainfall within a few days.

The cleanup effort is underway and 8,000 volunteers had enlisted for what is known as the Mud Army, which helps those who were inundated.

Queensland has accounted for nine of the deaths from the flooding disaster that has resulted from a low-pressure system that is moving south.

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