Families left to find their own solutions as lawmakers debate unemployment aid

Latrish Oseko, her 4-year-old daughter and her boyfriend have been staying in a motel in Delaware since unemployment aid ran out at the end of July. Lynette Hale lost her business, then her home.
6:10 | 08/14/20

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Transcript for Families left to find their own solutions as lawmakers debate unemployment aid
hitting especially hard. Get ready for bed. And -- Latricia's daughter asks a lot of questions, but one is particularly hard to answer. Do you continue to ask me when are we going home, when are we going home. I had to break down and say, honey, this is our home for right now. That's because right now, home is a motel room. It's a sad thing to have to explain to a 4-year-old, that this room is our home. Latrish, her boyfriend and daughter khaliah are a result of the chaos of covid-19. She lost her job as a data processor in the spring. Government aid like the stimulus and $600 a week in unemployment helped keep her family afloat. It just meant I was able to pay my bills. It wasn't a paycheck-to-paycheck kind of thing. But that federal money ran out at the end of July for more than 30 million Americans. Now Latricia just surviving on $300 per week. Her landlord didn't renew her lease. Without a job, she couldn't find a new house or apartment. That's how she ended up here. Time to wake up. Come on. Every morning, she wakes up with khaliah around 6:15. They hustle through the traditional morning rituals in tight quarters. Honey, we have to get going. And get out the door. Can you hold the baby up, please. Latrish still takes khaliah to day care. Dropping Ms. Khaliah off to day care. Even though it costs $150 a week, half of her current unemployment. Day care is absolutely necessary for me, so I can take care of these important appointments and interviews. By midmorning, latrish is applying for jobs on her phone. I have an appointment later. Driving all around town, looking for work. Every day I'm putting one foot in front of the other. Looking for work. Unemployment during the pandemic has disproportionately affected people of color. More than 14% of black workers were unemployed in July. Nearly 13% for Latinos and 12% for asian-americans. Compare that to the rate for white workers at 9%. For latrish, just watching what's happening in Washington is frustrating. Please get it together and understand that while you're fighting, you know, there may be a family like mine that doesn't have a home to go to. Doesn't have a bed to lay in at night. The emergency unemployment assistance expired on July 31st. Lawmakers are still locked in a stalemate over a more permanent relief package. Some Republicans argue $600 is too much, and some Americans, including latrish, are bringing in more money now than they would have if they were working. I would love to go to work. I want to be at work. I made $15 an hour working at my job. And I made, you know, more on unemployment. That's a, you know, that's not a secret to anybody for a lot of people. But it's not a good feeling to be onion employment. Nobody wants to be unemployed. Last weekend, president trump signed four executive actions, which includes extending some federal unemployment benefits. This is the payment relief during the covid-19 pandemic. The president's executive order calls for an extra $400 in relief for unemployed Americans, but the president is asking for cash-strapped states to put $100 of that bill. And governors say they simply don't have the money. So right now, it is unclear when or even if millions of Americans will be seeing any of this relief. Like latrish, millions of Americans are at the forefront of a looming housing crisis. It's just a panic all the time. I constantly am in panic. Lanet hill used to run a day care center in her home, but the business quickly unravelled during the pandemic. One e-mail says they will no longer be using me, then the next one, the next one. She used her savings to pay rent, about $2200 a month. But by July, she was tapped out, showing our Clayton Sandell the eviction notice from her I'm 70 years old and about to be on the street. What are you going to do? I don't know. Hale is one of millions of Americans part of a growing wave of evictions that experts warn is about to come crashing down. The United States is facing the most severe housing crisis our country has ever seen. Approximately 30 million to 40 million children and adults are facing evictions right now. Evictions can have far-reaching effects impacting beyond your address. It affects your credit, your ability to buy a home. It's linked to health ailments, including depression and traumatizing for children who are set back academically. For Trish, time is ticking and the questions from daughter khaliah keep coming. One day she said mommy, is it going to take very long for you to get up on your feet? It was just, we made a joke of it and I explained hopefully not much longer. Thanks to a gofundme, she's getting a little help from strangers. When they leave their message that, you know, you're a good mom, and you're doing your best right now, but it's going to get better, to know that I'm doing everything I can for my baby girl.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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