A New Generation of Downsizers

More people are trying to learn how to live with less space and less stuff.
5:52 | 10/21/15

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Transcript for A New Generation of Downsizers
. Think about it. From super size meals to mega mansions here in America we're often told that more is more. Well, the movers and shakers who star in the next piece respectfully disagree. They're shaking things up by moving into teeny tiny homes. Saying there's a million reasons why you could and perhaps should get onboard. Hey, I'm Andrew. I'm Angela. This is our bus. Reporter: Home sweet home usually doesn't come with four wheels and an oversized steering wheel. The driver's seat sometimes serves as extra seating. Reporter: But for Julie and Andrew Puckett a school bus was the perfect solution to their housing woes. We just didn't see a point in working 60 hours for something which at the end of the day we were never going to own. Reporter: After the Atlanta's couple's landlord raised their rent by over 25% they bought the blue bird bus for 10,000 bucks. It's not very big. Yet I can literally just show it all in one shot. Reporter: Four months and just another thousand bucks later, Julie and Andrew turned it into a functional 200 square foot mobile home. Plenty of extra storage. I also have handy slideout things. Reporter: Customized furniture. The lid flips up. Reporter: And even a wood burning stove. I think it's ready to heat somewhere over a thousand square feet. Reporter: They say there's enough room for everyone, even their dog, star buck. Thanks for taking the tour. Reporter: It's not just the pucketts downsizing. Tiny houses are having a major moment. These pint-size dwellings are the big stars of popular TV shows like "Tiny house hunters" and "Tiny house nation." But the people who are now calling them home say these tiny houses are more than a trend, they're a movement. An updated version of the American dream where less is more. Dreaming big in the past was being able to get a good house and then a better house. I think what people are discovering is that those things don't necessarily bring you closer faster to who you want to be. This is the palatial 84 square foot tiny house. Reporter: Dee Williams home is only 84 square feet. From wall to wall it's 6'10". Reporter: To put that in perspective the average American home is 2600 square feet, more than 30 times as big. The sleeping loft is a four foot ceiling up here. I measured myself in order to figure out, you know, how tall to make it. Reporter: Dee's place is not without its draw backs. One thing you may notice is missing is the faut set. I don't have running water. Reporter: It's not the plumbing that drew her in, it's the lifestyle. A lot of people are discovering that what they have is really what they need. Reporter: But tiny houses aren't just for the suburbs. In urban areas soaring populations and rising rents are making microapartments an increasingly appealing option. New construction projects in cities across the country are using modular designs to house the maximum amount of residents. Hi. How is it going? Good. Welcome. Reporter: Sounds a little squished, but for 20 somethings like Mary Ellen rowel, living big is about having less and doing more. Compared to most of my friends I have a thousand dollars or more extra every month that I can spend on going out. All right. So this is basically a quarter of the apartment. Reporter: At just under 6 feet our producer Chris James just barely fits into this new York City microabode which is about half the size of a average parking space. Inspiring rowel to get creative. This chair and table set, it all folds and I can hang it all right here on the wall. A friend actually helped me build this bed. It's basically a platform with two drawers underneath that roll out for extra storage. They're pretty big. Also pretty messy. Wow. Reporter: She does have all the necessities. A mini kitchen. I have a mini fridge. I have a mini sink. I have a toaster oven. I see everything but the bathroom. Where is the bathroom? Reporter: A bathroom, it's shared. So this is the bathroom that I don't spend a lot of time in there. Reporter: But the biggest sacrifice for this fashionista is no closet. One of the first things I decided when I moved in is to do my closet as faceouts instead of a rail. Reporter: Rowel says her living situation has forced her to cut back on clutter and focus on what really malters to her. You know, you can get by with a lot less. And my life functions as a Normal person's life in this tiny apartment. Reporter: But that may be a challenge for Gloria. I'm living in a house where there were five bedrooms, two living rooms, two bathrooms. Reporter: She's moving out of her parents' house and into her own microapartment in Rhode Island. Do you think all of my stuff is going to fit? No. No, really? That was a pretty quick answer, nick. Oh, my god. Oh, my god. It's not that small as I pictured it now that it's empty. I think pretty much the bedroom over here was the size of my walk-in closet before. So I kind of want to say that it's good to be fine, that I'll definitely fit my stuff but now I'm nervous about it. Reporter: The unpacking begins. What's this for? She's got so many like -- That's for the selfie stick. Do not lose that. Reporter: Eventually Gloria finds a place for just about everything. I definitely think that it's coming together. Reporter: She gets to go out and enjoy the quality of life so many people are gaining just by cutting back. I don't need the couch and the big screen. I would rather have this. Time to call the movers. For more tiny apartment tours check out our youtube channel times two.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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