Representation on screen gives validation to trans and queer fans: Part 2

Despite her confidence on television, Dominique Jackson said that she secretly suffered from an anxiety disorder. Career and life coach Naomi Green works with transgender women in Dallas, Texas.
5:21 | 07/20/21

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Transcript for Representation on screen gives validation to trans and queer fans: Part 2
borbies. When I was younger I wa not allowed to play with barbies. I would sneak them. I had this love for them. I just started. Reporter: Surrounded by the comforts of home, Dominique Jackson is fearless. And you, frankly, look like a Barbie come to life. We're all barbies. It's mommy Barbie. Reporter: Unapologetically living her truth, meaningful mementos after a lifetime of but all this success almost didn't happen. You're clearly not winning the game. Nor are you playing it fairly. Reporter: This is her audition. The one she barely made it to. For the role that would change her life. I was not going to go. I was a few weeks out of bottom I still had stitches. And I looked at every possible excuse. There was no way I was going to get this part, and I wasn't worth it, I wasn't enough. But I knew the lines. I knew the character. And I fought myself. I fought through agoraphobia. I fought it and I got up. Reporter: For decades the woman behind such a confident, feisty persona said she secretly suffered from agoraphobia, a crippling fear of leaving her house, triggered perhaps by her - past. Within all of that pain and the struggle of not knowing where I would sleep that night, having to depend on some man's fetish in order for me to eat and find a place to sleep, was -- it broke me. Many times I would get to my door and I would just close the door, and I would just sit there and cry. I didn't want to be outside. I couldn't go outside. What does that meal like? Feel like? Being trapped. Everything around me was and it's really hard to sit there and try to focus and smile with people, but on the inside, it was bawling, it was hollering. I just wanted to get home. The only thing that got me outside was I would drink to the point where, okay, yeah, I can go. Self-medication. Reporter: But amidst that struggle, she also unexpectedly found love. And a pillar of support. With her straight cisgendered male bodyguard, Edwin, who has two young sons. He's your Kevin Costner, you're Whitney Houston. We are "The bodyguard." It's crazy. It was the loving, the caring, the affection, everything like that. It was that moment of going, oh, this is real. You've been a ballroom mom. Yeah. For so many years. To transition to real-life stepmom is a big deal. It is a big deal. What is that kind of motherhood like for you? At first it was like, no, I don't want this. And they show up. And they're loving. And they open their beautiful eyes. They look up at you. They're like, yeah, so we want to, you know -- chocolate milk, please. You just fall in love. Reporter: That love giving her new strength. I don't want to be dependant, but Edwin does help me a lot. He gets me to go to things and be normal. Love you. And one thing that Edwin did, he has now helped me to do it without alcohol at all. Reporter: Her triumphs both on and off screen inspiring countless trans fans who say they feel seen. "Pose" has given me extra oomph and energy to be able to walk out with my head held high. The world was finally seeing an accurate depiction. It makes me want to continue doing what I do and giving back to other individuals. Reporter: One of the show's avid fans, Naomi green, is a real-life electra. Part of the ballroom scene since the '90s. It's not the same type of transgender woman representing every period on the show. There are many different trans women who represent many different backgrounds, shapes, colors, sizes, all of that. Reporter: As an advocate, Naomi says representation from "Pose" is vital for the trans women of color she serves in Dallas, Texas. We offer a leadership development with services like resume-building, professional a ton of different services that we really focus on. And the reason being is because of many things that you saw in the show "Pose." You have to shine so bright out there that they can't deny you. Reporter: A show whose legacy will last far beyond its three-season run. I've read of people saying this is going to save lives. I hope so. When we were filming the second season of the show, it had a young -- I had a young gay black man approach me and say with tears in his eyes, watching the first season of the show inspired me to go and get tested for the first time with my boyfriend. We're not going anywhere, we're going to be making strides for a very long time. I feel like the sky is literally limitless. The legacy of "Pose" is respect. It's love. It is family. Formed in order for people to find their joy, find their love, find their life, find understanding and respect amongst each other. When we come back, a final

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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