'Stand Up For Heroes': Marine, Paralyzed in War, Walks Again

Marine Capt. Derek Herrera, paralyzed by a sniper bullet in Afghanistan, re-learns how to walk with ReWalk, a wearable robotic system that powers hip and knee motion.
2:21 | 11/06/14

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Transcript for 'Stand Up For Heroes': Marine, Paralyzed in War, Walks Again
Finally tonight, we have a technology story of an entirely different flavor. This is about an extraordinary new tool helping some extraordinary people learn how to walk again. Here's ABC's Byron Pitts. Reporter: Tonight, the famous, the powerful, stood in awe of the unmistakably courageous. All here for the eighth annual bob woodruff foundation stand up for heroes. Stars like Bruce Springsteen. ? a night to honor the men and women who answered America's call. In this room of giants, none taller than Marine Corps captain Derek Herrera. A sniper's bullet in Afghanistan in 2012 nearly took his life, not his grit. I knew immediately I was paralyzed from the chest down. I didn't really know what the extent of that injury would be, permanent or not. Reporter: He attacked rehab the way you'd expect a marine special ops officer would. Today, we saw the amazing result as new technology allows captain Herrera to walk again. Just when you stood up, I felt joy for you. Yeah. I mean, it's different, right? It's different being able to look you in the eye and talk and stuff. So, it's good. Reporter: It's the exo skeleton system, made by rewalk. A wearable robotic system that powers hip and knee motion. This is what I use to select the different functions. Small gray sensor right here. And so it senses when I lean forward and shift my weight from one foot to the other. Reporter: Derek is the first American and the first active duty service member to own one. A nearly $70,000 investment, fda approved, but not yet covered by insurance. For now, Derek spends most of his time in his wheelchair, but some day, he hopes to leave it behind. Tonight, captain Herrera shared the spotlight with those who share his sacrifice. Thank you guys so much. Reporter: He will retire from the Marines later this month, accepting a civilian job. CEO of an American energy drink company. For "Nightline," I'm Byron Pitts in New York. What a fantastic story. Our thanks to Byron Pitts. And to my friends bob and lee woodruff for the ne nominal work they do for America's wounded warriors.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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