'Surviving R. Kelly' doc sparks investigation into abuse allegations

"Nightline" takes a look at how the series documented allegations of sexual abuse against the singer, and the ripple effect it has caused.
9:01 | 01/10/19

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Transcript for 'Surviving R. Kelly' doc sparks investigation into abuse allegations
It just kept going, going, going. I want my story to be heard so people can take the situation seriously. Why didn't anyone know this? No one cared because we were black girls. No matter how demeaning it felt. Reporter: Harrowing stories, alleged by dozens of women, accusing the r&b legend of all forms of abuse. Told in the docuseries "Surviving R. Kelly." It's been two years now, and we still haven't seen our daughter. Reporter: The series has been watched by over 18 million people. Law enforcement is now involved in two states, just today protests raged outside his studio. Kelly still denies all accusations. The man behind anthems like "Ignition" and "I believe I can fly." Have been plagued with allegations of sex with underage girls well back into the '90s. Now they're going back and saying, maybe that was true. Reporter: Tamara Simmons is one of the producers of the series. When you see these patterns that date back to the '90s, what they went through is real. Reporter: They say in light of the me too movement, it's time to investigate some of those claims. Some are 2017. There were a few articles that surfaced that detailed new alleged victims. Parallel to that, the me too movement started to take off. Once we started to get in touch with some of these women and dig a little deeper into their stories, it bloomed into other people. You have a powerful person loved in the African-American community and then you have a victim nobody cares about. It shows you how rich and powerful men can get away with a lot of things. Reporter: Stars like Jada Pinkett Smith are asking how he can still sell albums despite the controversy. I really don't want to believe it's because black girls don't care. Reporter: More than 50 people were interviewed for the docuseries, including more than a dozen alleged victims who claim they were physically and sexually abused stretching over months and years. Many say they were just teenagers when they first met the star. He was being really nice. And he asked me how old I was. I told him I was 17. Young girls are impressionable. Like, he's R. Kelly. Reporter: Kelly's attorney says these allegations are nothing. That if he did anything wrong you would hear facts, not the pitchfork posse. I'm here today to encourage victims of sexual assault or domestic violence related to these allegations to please get in touch with our office. Reporter: After the docuseries aired, cook county, Illinois state attorney Tim fox issued a call for anyone with information to come forward. We don't have the ability to deal in rumor in innuendo. We have to deal with facts and circumstances. The most credible are those who feel they've been a victim of a crime. We are going to be seeing more of what we just saw, which is investigators appealing to the public and saying, you, too, can come forward. That, too, is a significant change from what we've seen before. Reporter: On Tuesday, faith Rogers, who also appeared in the series, appealed to a judge in New York to expedite her case. Rogers is suing Kelly for sexual battery and willfully and deliberately infecting her with herpes. Kelly never filed a response with the court. It was consensual, but it was consented by intimidation. I look back, and there's an iPad, and I just turned my head away. I didn't want my face to be on it. Reporter: Sexual misconduct have dogged Kelly for 20 years. In 2008, he was acquitted of charges of child pornography around that infamous video that shows him allegedly urinating into the mouth of a minor. It's sort of the drug of celebrity, you know? And I think one of the things that made these cases difficult to prosecute is because R. Kelly was this beloved icon in the black community. Reporter: In a music interview with Toure, he failed to answer what to many was a basic question. Do you like teenage girls? When you say teenage, how old are we talking? Girls who are teenagers. 19? 19 and younger. I have some 19-year-old friends. Reporter: Long before that tape emerged, R. Kelly made his desire for young women well-known. It was discovered the singer was 15 at the time of their marriage. But it happened to his daughter. I just felt like it was not going to happen to me. Reporter: He says Kelly mentored his daughter and eventually trapped her. His daughter says she's with him voluntarily. The last time I saw my daughter was 2016 at her graduation. Reporter: A story that sounds eerily similar to what Timothy savage says happened to his daughter Joslin. We got a call from her. And she told us she was with R. Kelly. We was like, what are you doing? You're in college. My daughter is being held against her will. Reporter: He appealed to the public last year in a bid for help, alleging that his daughter is being held against her will and is being sexually abused by Kelly. Just this month he filed a police report detailing a call with one of Kelly's managers. As a police officer listened on. The manager threatened to ruin the family if they participated in the lifetime series. A separate man threatened his life and told him his daughter was being held by Kelly. His daughter denied she was involved any kind of sex cult. None of that is true. Reporter: The district attorney has confirmed since the docuseries aired they've been in touch with the savage family and has tried to contact Joslin to no avail. There are statutes of limitations, is that going to be a problem for sex crimes? Yes. But perhaps not for all. She said this happened in may 2017. That wasn't too long ago. Do I believe that he should serve time in jail? I do. Reporter: You would like to see him arrested? Yes. Reporter: Kelly's ex-wife Andrea Kelly believes justice is long overdue. She says she was a victim herself for 13 long years of emotional and sexual abuse all at the hands of Robert Kelly. She and the singer have three children together. Did you ever fear for your life? Yes. Reporter: You thought he would kill you. Yes. At the end of the day, we don't have to keep talking about the storm. Reporter: She feels that she and her story are being used for something greater. What have you learned about yourself through all of this? I know now that I'm being used for something greater than me. Nobody just cares about the black women that speak out. Especially the black community. It's the black community that bashes the black women who speak out about abuse. We've been watching them since they came forward in 2017 try various attempts to get media attention, but it doesn't take hold. It goes back to this idea that black girls don't matter. Reporter: For many of these women, their solace comes in speaking out and knowing that now people are listening. You know, you're not alone. You're not alone.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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