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  • 12 Best Presidential Campaign Posters

    12 Best Presidential Campaign Posters
    Barack Obama's "Hope" campaign poster, designed by the artist Shepard Fairey, is prominently displayed on a building in Albuquerque, N.M.
    Getty Images
  • Presidential Campaign Posters

    Presidential Campaign Posters
    Abraham Lincoln's name was shortened to "Abram" to fit on this 1860s campaign poster. While many such posters and pamphlets were handed out by Republicans in support of Lincoln, he did not personally travel the country or give stump speeches. In those days, presidential candidates were thought to be above the bickering of politicians in campaigns.
    Library of Congress
  • Presidential Campaign Posters

    Presidential Campaign Posters
    William McKinley stands proudly on top of an enlarged gold coin in this 1896 poster. McKinley was an advocate for a strong currency and the gold standard, while his Democratic opponents advocated a shift to free silver.
    Library of Congress
  • Presidential Campaign Posters

    Presidential Campaign Posters
    In the election of 1900, Republican William McKinley faced Democrat William Jennings Bryan for the second time. Running on a thriving economy in his first term, McKinley highlighted his economic agenda with this campaign poster.
    Library of Congress
  • Presidential Campaign Posters

    Presidential Campaign Posters
    Campaigning for an unprecedented fourth term in 1944, President Franklin D. Roosevelt appealed to voters' patriotism in World War II to win reelection. In this poster, Uncle Sam is ordering FDR to stay and finish the job.
    Library of Congress
  • Presidential Campaign Posters

    Presidential Campaign Posters
    New York Gov. Thomas E. Dewey played off of his last name in this 1944 campaign poster, which portrayed him as a youthful alternative to the aging incumbent Franklin D. Roosevelt.
    Library of Congress
  • Presidential Campaign Posters

    Presidential Campaign Posters
    This 1976 poster linked the image of then-President Gerald Ford to the popular sitcom character "Fonzie" of "Happy Days." Ford tried to appeal to voters yearning for a happier time before Watergate and Vietnam. He lost to Jimmy Carter.
    Library of Congress
  • Presidential Campaign Posters

    Presidential Campaign Posters
    Gov. George Romney of Michigan, Mitt Romney's father, made a bid for the Republican nomination in 1968 by portraying himself as a moderate who supported civil rights and government social programs. He lost out to Richard Nixon.
    Library of Congress
  • Presidential Campaign Posters

    Presidential Campaign Posters
    Jimmy Carter's image as a savior for America, much as Jesus Christ was a savior for Christians, is the focal point of this 1976 campaign poster. Carter ran as a Washington outsider and a reformer, not tainted by the political scandals of previous administrations.
    Library of Congress
  • Presidential Campaign Posters

    Presidential Campaign Posters
    Robert Kennedy focused his 1968 campaign on opposition to the Vietnam War, which divided the country. This poster evokes the pacifism of the 1960s hippie movement.
    Library of Congress
  • Presidential Campaign Posters

    Presidential Campaign Posters
    Ronald Reagan's 1984 campaign promised to bring America back from moral depravity and economic decline. Reagan's pro-USA message even prompted his campaign to use Bruce Springsteen's "Born in the U.S.A." The campaign took it as a tribute to small town America. A lifelong Democrat, Springsteen said the song was about the mistreatment of Vietnam veterans, and asked the campaign to stop playing it.
    Library of Congress
  • Presidential Campaign Posters

    Presidential Campaign Posters
    In 1988, Jesse Jackson ran for the second time for the Democratic nomination for president. He tried to tap into the dissatisfaction of minority groups, and attacked the economic policies of the outgoing Ronald Reagan.
    Library of Congress
  • Presidential Campaign Posters

    Presidential Campaign Posters
    This iconic one-word poster for Barack Obama during his 2008 run illustrates the grassroots flavor of his campaign. Relying on a message of hope and change, Obama defeated Sen. John McCain to become the nation's first African-American commander-in-chief.
    Library of Congress