Bernie Sanders Looks to Woo Superdelegates in Long-Shot Bid for Nomination

The Senator said California and New Jersey could have a big influence.

"You know what, I’m an old-fashioned guy. I kind of think that democracy is a good idea," Sanders said. "I think vigorous debate about the issues is a good idea."

Yesterday, Senator Minority Leader Harry Reid said of his colleague’s bid, "Sometimes you just have to give up."

Sanders fought back during his morning press conference, “What you’re saying is the people of California should not have a right to vote for President. Well, ask the people of California whether or not they would like to select the Democratic nominee for President."

Sanders said his campaign had starting contacting superdelegates and would continue to do so “on a more individual basis” after the big primaries next week.

For months, during his public rallies and interviews, the Senator has argued that the majority of super delegates should not have backed Clinton as early as they did. He said they should now consider the enthusiasm of his crowds and how well he is doing in head-to-head polls against Donald Trump as a sign that his campaign is strongest.

However, to date, very few super delegates have indicated any intention to change their minds. When ABC News asked Sanders if his message to fans was becoming disingenuous, he again pivoted back to his hopes for California.

"I don’t think it’s disingenuous to say that the people of California have the right to determine who the Democratic nominee for President is, or the people of New Jersey. Let the people speak and let the superdelegates make their case," he said.

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