Harry Reid Accuses FBI Director of Breaking Federal Law

PHOTO: U.S. Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid speaks at a campaign rally for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Cheyenne High School on Oct. 23, 2016 in North Las Vegas, Nevada.PlayEthan Miller/Getty Images
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Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid is accusing FBI Director James Comey of breaking federal law by announcing Friday that the bureau is reviewing additional emails possibly connected to Hillary Clinton's private server.

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In a letter he sent to Comey on Sunday, Reid alleged that the FBI director broke the Hatch Act, a federal law passed in 1939 that limits the political activities of federal employees.

Reid also suggested Comey is concealing information about Donald Trump's connections to the Russian government while "rushing" to publicize the Clinton information. He did not detail the nature of the Trump information he alleged the FBI possesses.

"Your actions in recent months have demonstrated a disturbing double standard for the treatment of sensitive information, with what appears to be a clear intent to aid one political party over another," Reid wrote.

Reid also noted that all Justice Department employees were re-apprised of their responsibilities under the Hatch Act in a March 2016 memo.

The retiring Democratic leader concluded his letter by indicating that he has lost trust in Comey.

"When Republicans filibustered your nomination and delayed your confirmation longer than any previous nominee to your position, I led the fight to get you confirmed because I believed you to be a principled public servant," he wrote. "With the deepest regret, I now see that I was wrong."

The FBI did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Comey told Congress of the decision in a letter Friday afternoon, later saying he felt compelled to do so because he had previously assured lawmakers and the public that the FBI investigation was "completed."

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