ARCHIVAL VIDEO: House and Senate Agree on 'Historic' 1994 Crime Bill Terms

July 28, 1994: President Bill Clinton describes the proposed crime bill to negotiators.
2:05 | 04/11/16

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Transcript for ARCHIVAL VIDEO: House and Senate Agree on 'Historic' 1994 Crime Bill Terms
Good evening we begin tonight with law and order and politics nearly a year after President Clinton first proposed it. Negotiators for the house and the senate agreed today and a crime bill which its supporters call historic. And its detractors are spending boondoggle. It isn't even all finished both houses will still have to vote on a compromise. And then we'll come the politics of who's going to get the credit. First tonight ABC's Cokie Roberts. The for a perfect backdrop of men and women in blue a happy President Clinton sounded like a proud parent. He's described the crime bill. We the toughest largest and smartest federal attack on crime. In the history of the United States of America. The more than thirty billion dollar measure would put 100000. New police officers on the street. Expand the death penalty to cover more than fifty categories of crimes including carjacking murders and drive by shootings. Lock up third time violent offenders for life. Spent eight billion dollars on prisons ban nineteen specific assault weapons and spend more than seven Canadian dollars and crime prevention programs. It's those spending provisions for such programs as midnight basketball games designed to keep kids off the streets. That are attracting Republican fire. This is not a Christmas tree this is the whole emerald city of social spending and a crime bill might come in for Republican derision. But it's going to be tough for them to go against the measure because so many voters he has resigned as the very top. Of their list of concerns. Now we have. A serious build it meets the need to the American people. That's the problem for Republicans they don't want the president to reach the much needed political benefit of a crime bill signing ceremony. But they also don't want to invite political fray as the killing a bill that voters want. So enough Republicans are likely to join grudgingly with the most of the Democrats. For the crime bill to become law. Cokie Roberts ABC news Capitol Hill.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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