Net Neutrality: Why Verizon Used Type Writer Font to Blast FCC Vote

Mobile carrier says FCC is imposing "1930s Rules on the Internet."

The FCC today voted 3-2 to reclassify Internet service providers as common carriers under Title II of the 1934 Communications Act.

Today's decision is unlikely to change your daily Internet habits and instead helps preserve the status quo, which some companies were pushing to change by offering tiered subscription plans.

Verizon called the vote a "throwback Thursday" for the FCC and said passing "badly antiquated regulations is a radical step that presages a time of uncertainty for consumers, innovators and investors."

Challengers of net neutrality have expressed worry that regulating the Internet could impact what has become an important part of the economy.

"We've got a free and Internet today and it has been a tremendous success," Bret Swanson, a visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, told ABC News. "The question is why we want to impose 80-year-old regulations on perhaps the most thriving part of our economy."

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