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  • Burning debris can be seen in the lava flow from Mount Kilauea that is inching closer to the village of Pahoa, Hawaii, Oct. 29, 2014.
    Marco Garcia/Reuters
  • The lava flow from the Kilauea Volcano moves along the ground, Oct. 28, 2014, in Pahoa, Hawaii.
    Andrew Hara/Getty Images
  • The lava flow from the Kilauea Volcano moves along he ground, Oct. 28, 2014, in Pahoa, Hawaii.
    Andrew Hara/Getty Images
  • Lava that has pushed through a fence marking a property boundary above the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii is seen Oct. 28, 2014. After weeks of slow, stop-and-go movement, a river of asphalt-black lava was less than the length of a football field from homes in the Big Island community.
    U.S. Geological Survey/AP Photo
  • Lava burning vegetation as it approaches a property boundary above the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii is seen Oct. 28, 2014.
    U.S. Geological SurveyAP Photo
  • Lava flow is seen in Hawaii, Oct. 28, 2014.
    Gina Sunseri/ABC News
  • Residents in Pahoa, Hawaii are facing evacuation as a lava flow continues to advance.
    ABC News
  • A member of the ABC News crew films by the lava flow in Hawaii in the early morning, Oct. 28, 2014.
    Gina Sunseri/ABC News
  • An aerial view of the front of the lava flow from the Kilauea Volcano, Oct. 27, 2014, in Pahoa, Hawaii.
    USGS/Getty Images
  • This photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows the lava flow from an eruption that began June 27, as the front remains active and continues to advance towards the northeast threatening the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii, Oct. 26, 2014. Authorities said that the lava had advanced about 250 yards since Saturday morning and was moving at the rate of about 10 to 15 yards an hour. The flow front passed through a predominantly Buddhist cemetery, covering grave sites in the mostly rural region of Puna, and was roughly a half-mile from Pahoa Village Road, the main street of Pahoa.
    U.S. Geological Survey/AP Photo
  • Lava flow burns through thick vegetation below the pasture downslope of the Pa-hoa cemetery, Oct. 27, 2014 in Pahoa, Hawaii.
    USGS/Getty Images
  • A Hawaii Volcano Observatory geologist stands on a partly cooled section of lava flow near the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii, Oct. 25, 2014. Note the thin red horizontal line of molten lava visible along the bottom third of the photo. The flow here is about three feet thick. Dozens of residents in this rural area of Hawaii were placed on alert as flowing lava continued to advance.
    U.S. Geological Survey/AP Photo
  • A small shed is consumed by lava in a pasture between the Pahoa cemetery and Apaa Street near the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii, Oct. 25, 2014.
    U.S. Geological Survey/AP Photo
  • Lava flow advances across the pasture between the Pahoa cemetery and Apaa Street, engulfing a barbed wire fence, near the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii, Oct. 25, 2014.
    U.S. Geological Survey/AP Photo
  • A Hawaii Volcano Observatory geologist maps the margin of the June 27 lava flow in the open field below Cemetery Road near the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii, Oct. 26, 2014.
    U.S. Geological Survey/AP Photo
  • The lava flow from Kilauea Volcano that began June 27 is seen as it crosses Apaa Street near the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii in this Oct. 24, 2014 photo from the U.S. Geological Survey. Hawaii authorities told several dozen residents near the active lava flow to prepare for a possible evacuation in the next three to five days as molten rock oozed across the country road and edged closer to homes. It's currently about six-tenths of a mile from Pahoa Village Road, the town's main street.
    U.S. Geological Survey/AP Photo
  • Hawaii Volcano Observatory geologists walk over the surface of the flow to track surface breakouts along a portion of the flow margin, Oct. 22, 2014. The growing stream of lava threatening homes is expanding and speeding up as it heads toward the small rural town. Officials say the lava advanced nearly 460 yards from Thursday morning to Friday, Oct. 24, 2014.
    U.S. Geological Survey/AP Photo
  • This Oct. 22, 2014 photo provided by the United States Geological Survey shows lava flow slowly moving through thick vegetation and creating thick plumes of smoke as it advances on the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii. Frequent methane explosions occur, resulting from cooked vegetation releasing methane which then ignites. The explosions can range from small puffs to loud cannon-like blasts, and are an additional hazard in the immediate area of the flow margin.
    U.S. Geological Survey/AP Photo
  • Numerous smoke plumes arising from active breakouts burn vegetation at the flow margin, near the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii, Oct. 22, 2014.
    U.S. Geological Survey/AP Photo
  • A geologist marks the coordinates of the Kilauea lava flow front with a GPS unit, Oct. 22, 2014. A 13-mile finger of lava from Kilauea Volcano has started to move quickly again, and could hit a secondary road sometime Friday, Oct. 24, 2014. Officials on Hawaii's Big Island won't start evacuating people until the lava flow is within three to five days of affecting Pahoa residents.
    U.S. Geological Survey/AP Photo
  • Lava from the Pu'u 'O'o vent of Kilauea Volcano slowly approaches the Kaohe Homesteads subdivision near the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii, Oct. 10, 2014. Residents on Hawaii's southernmost island already dealt with one tropical storm this year and are coping with the threat of slowly encroaching lava. Now, meteorologists say a potential hurricane is heading toward them and the rest of the island chain. The governor proclaimed an emergency to help the state respond to the storm on Oct. 15, 2014.
    U.S. Geological Survey/AP Photo
  • This Sept. 15, 2014 photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows a close view of the surface activity from lava flow that began on June 27, 2014 from the Kilauea volcano in Pahoa, on the Big Island of Hawaii.
    U.S. Geological Survey/AP Photo
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