Signs of Forced Entry Found in DC Mansion Murder Case, Documents Show

Police previously said there were no signs of forced entry.

— -- New documents released in the quadruple murder at a Washington, D.C. mansion reveal that investigators believe the suspect or suspects forced their way into the home -- a change from earlier when police said there were no apparent signs of a break-in.

The documents include a picture obtained by ABC News that shows an apparent boot print on a set of French doors and a broken window pane as well as search warrants for the home. Police are now trying to determine whether the killer, or killers, broke into the home of Savvas Savopoulos that way.

"The doors have a single broken window pane located next to a door latch and alarm sensor," Det. Mike Fulton of the Metropolitan Police wrote in an affidavit for a search warrant filed May 18 and unsealed today. "The door is broken near the lock and a shoe or boot print is visible on the exterior, suggesting forced entry."

Investigators determined that the footwear print on the door had not come from emergency responders.

According to the search warrant, police are looking for “shoes that contain a tread pattern similar to...” the print found on the door, “clothing or shoes containing blood,” and “duct tape or other material that can be used to bind hands and feet,” among other items.

Savopoulos, his wife, son and housekeeper were held hostage and slain at the home on May 14.

Daron Wint has been charged in the murders, but police said in the criminal complaint that they believed others participated in the crime.

Over the past several weeks, investigators have returned to the home looking for evidence. The search warrant police sought just after Wint’s arrest –- and unsealed today -- provides more insight into the investigation.

One of the warrants confirms the timeline of the murders of Savopoulos, his wife Amy, son Phillip and housekeeper Veralicia Figueroa, who were "held captive by Mr. Wint and others until the $40,000 was delivered to the Savopoulos residence."

The document confirms that cash was delivered by Jordan Wallace, an employee of Savopoulos' business, American Iron Works. At the victim's request, Wallace placed the money, which was in a red bag covered by a manila envelope, on the seat of a red sports car in the garage.

“After the money was delivered,” the search warrant says, “the four decedents were killed.”

The search warrant document reveals that since the murders, the police have been trying to locate an additional suspect by tracking the cellphone of victim Amy Savopoulos. Investigators suspect that her phone was taken by an unknown suspect during the crime.

The victims' cellphones have not been located.

The police also asked for court approval to search the Chevy that Wint was captured in, and the truck that was accompanying his vehicle. The document notes that Wint was sitting in the rear passenger seat of the car, and he was carrying a bag.

The vehicle and bag were taken into custody, and an occupant of that car told police he purchased money orders
"after the murders under the direction of an identified person," who had provided him the money, the documents said.

In the truck that was travelling with Wint’s car, police found the person who was allegedly providing the cash for the money orders and found $100 bills, which matched the denomination delivered to the Savopoulos house, the documents said.

Wallace could not immediately be reached for comment.