Aid groups work to help the Rohingya minority fleeing attacks by the Myanmar government

Over 600,000 refugees have poured into Bangladesh since Aug. 25.
2:54 | 10/27/17

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Transcript for Aid groups work to help the Rohingya minority fleeing attacks by the Myanmar government
We'll be watching this weekend. Next to an unfolding crisis and the race to get help to even the youngest of victims. It comes amid a new report today from U.N. Investigators about a people considered one of the most persecuted minorities on Earth. The ro hin ga escaping their homes. 6,000 have fled the horror. And Bob woodruff on what he's discovered on the border. Reporter: Chaos, fear, and desperation here, we witnessed the dire need unfolding before our eyes. This man, keeping the crowds at bay with a stick. Aid groups here on the border are racing with food. People would be in a difficult situation. Reporter: 8,000 people lining up just today at this save the children food distribution center, sitting, waiting in these long lines. Given pink slips of papers, letting workers know how much rice, oil, salt, to give to each family. So he's come here with a family of six, right? He has four children, he tells us. He's been here for a month. We have seen firsthand this crisis for three years now and now the rohingya are running for their lives. Reports of villages surrounded. Homes burnt to the ground. Tortu torture. Executions and rape. Over 600,000 ro hongya joined who are already here. There are 1 million living in these camps. Of those new arrivals 360 are children. The solemn faces tell their story. Carrying supplies bigger than they are. Their new home and new hope. There are bright spots after two harrowing months apart this mother was reunited with her two daughters who got lost as they fled. I asked her what it felt like when she found her kids. I just couldn't stop hugging them she said. Bob woodruff is not far from the border. I know you and human rights investigators finished your first mission from Bangladesh reporting the same thing, a quote, consistent method Cal pattern of killings, torture rape and arson taking place. Reporter: Those findings today found. Investigators said they are deeply disturbed and hearing these kinds of stories for a long time. David. Bob on this story again for us. Thank you. We should note if you would like to help these families save the children is among the groups on the ground there. They say $15 can help provide a family with a kitchen kit helping parents to once again feed their children. We have much more on the "World news tonight" Facebook page. Much more ahead on "World news tonight" this Friday. The high speed chase on an

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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