Boeing CEO faces Congress on anniversary of 1st 737 Max crash

Dennis Muilenburg took questions from lawmakers on whether the company intentionally concealed defects in the MCAS system from the FAA.
2:10 | 10/30/19

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Boeing CEO faces Congress on anniversary of 1st 737 Max crash
On capitol hill today, on the one-year anniversary of the first deadly crash involving Boeing's 737 max jets, the company's CEO coming under fire. The CEO apologizing to families of the more than a dozen of them standing with photos of their loved ones lost. But the questioning was heated. Did Boeing ignore warnings? Here's ABC's David Kerley. Reporter: For the first time, and on tonight's one-year anniversary of the first 737 max crash, Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg faced congress. We've made mistakes and we got some things wrong. Reporter: Listening, family members of some of the 346 who were killed in those two crashes. They were in flying coffins as a result of Boeing deciding that it was going to conceal mcas from the pilots. The premise that we would lie or conceal is just not consistent with our values. Reporter: Mcas, a system added to the 737 max, which misfired, repeatedly nosing down those jets. You put in a system that overrides the pilot in command of that aircraft. You set those pilots up for failure. Reporter: Senators from both parties demanding to know if Boeing intentionally concealed defects in the mcas system from the FAA. So basically, I lied to the regulators -- unknowingly. Reporter: That from a message between two test pilots in 2016 appear to suggest problems with the mcas, but the CEO says he didn't see those until earlier this year. You are the CEO. The buck stops with you. I would walk before I would get on a 737 max. Reporter: Also, for the first time, Muilenburg met privately with those family members. Who seemed unsatisfied. He gave some flimsy excuses on why they did not ground the max after lion air. Reporter: Both Republicans and Democrats in congress, which mandated the certification system nearly 15 years ago, now say changes do need to be made. The Boeing CEO hopes the maxflis before the end of the year. Others, David, think it's going to be sometime early next year. All right, David Kerley, thank you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"duration":"2:10","description":"Dennis Muilenburg took questions from lawmakers on whether the company intentionally concealed defects in the MCAS system from the FAA.","mediaType":"default","section":"ABCNews/WNT","id":"66620107","title":"Boeing CEO faces Congress on anniversary of 1st 737 Max crash","url":"/WNT/video/boeing-ceo-faces-congress-anniversary-1st-737-max-66620107"}