Germanwings Co-Pilot Andreas Lubitz Had Suicidal Tendencies, Was Treated For Mental Illness, Prosecutor Says

Recovery teams struggle to identify remains of the 150 people killed when co-pilot intentionally crashed plane into the French Alps.
2:16 | 03/31/15

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Transcript for Germanwings Co-Pilot Andreas Lubitz Had Suicidal Tendencies, Was Treated For Mental Illness, Prosecutor Says
It's still unclear whether the failure to stop was due to pure panic or a final wrong turn during a wild night. Now to the case of the co-pilot that crashed the plane into the alps. Andreas lubitz, getting some of his training in the united States. New video emerging showing him flying. Some asking how he was ever allowed to fly with that medical history. Here's Alex Marquardt. Reporter: Andreas lubitz, peacefully sailing though the sky as he piloted a glider. Today, German authorities revealing that behind a seemingly happy and healthy facade lay a troubled mind. Lubitz was treated, they said, for suicidal tendencies before he became a pilot. He sought help for problems with his vision. And medication for mental illness was reportedly found in his apartment. But did lubitz ever reveal this information to his employers? Tonight, germanwings wouldn't say. We just spoke with a senior official from Europe's equivalent of the FAA. He told us that all pilots in Europe have to fill out this questionnaire. Asking whether the candidate has ever attempted suicide or have any kind of psychological or psychiatric trouble. So did lubitz lie? It is not unheard-of for pilots to keep from their employers medical conditions that they feel might ground them. Reporter: We have also learned chilling new details from that fatal flight. According to an unconfirmed report in Germany's "Bild" newspaper reporting shortly after takeoff, the captain told his co-pilot he didn't have a chance to use the airport restroom. Lubitz responding, "You can go now." Locked out of the cockpit, the captain is heard yelling, "For god's sake, open the door!" Then, loud metallic blows to the cockpit door. Warning messages blaring for the pilot to pull up, but lubitz says nothing. And the last sound before the moment of impact, the passengers screaming. German authorities say he never exhibited aggression, and his motive is still a mystery. And now to the mystery of

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