Kurdish forces withdraw from Ras Al-Ayn

The move comes as part of the deal the U.S. struck with Turkey.
2:45 | 10/21/19

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Transcript for Kurdish forces withdraw from Ras Al-Ayn
We head overseas to Syria, where the clock is ticking on a 120-hour pause. Kurdish troops have pulled out from one key town. But a kurdish commander tells ABC news they will not clear the safe zone entirely. There are also fears about ethnic cleansing, and what the U.S. Would do to stop it. ABC news foreign correspondent James Longman is in the region. Reporter: With reports of pockets of fighting raging on, it seems to have been a pause that never was. But tonight kurdish forces have withdrawn from the key town of ras al-ayn, the first pullout since the conflict began. This move required as part of the deal the U.S. Struck with Turkey last week in which a safe zone would be carved out all along the border. President trump defending the deal. Sometimes you have to go through some pain before you can get a good solution, but the kurds are very happy about it. Reporter: But kurdish commander nesrin Abdulla says with more than 200 dead, they are far from happy. Donald Trump says the kurds are happy. Translator: I would tell Mr. Trump that the kurds are not happy. They've killed all these people so of course we are not happy. This agreement has allowed Turkey to occupy our land and kill our people. Reporter: A major issue lies ahead. Turkey is demanding kurdish forces leave the entire safe zone, something the kurds say they have not signed up for. But the rest of northern Syria, that's not part of the agreement? Translator: Exactly. This is not included. They only told us ras al-ayn. Reporter: The kurds fearful Turkey's ultimate motive is an ethnic cleansing sparked by president trump's removal of U.S. Forces. For many, many, years, Turkey had terrorists. They had a lot of people in there that they couldn't have. They've suffered a lot of loss of lives also. And they had to have it cleaned out. Reporter: On "This week," secretary of state Mike Pompeo was pressed on the issue. Can you assure the kurdish people and the president's allies in congress that you will not be party to ethnic cleansing? George, we were very clear and the vice president could not have been more clear when we were speaking with president erdogan, in that turkish-controlled space, that there wouldn't be attacks on minorities. That this was about getting a cease-fire, a secure area, and that this, in fact, will save lives. James joining us live from northern Iraq. House speaker Nancy Pelosi making a surprise trip to that region with a congressional delegation to meet with the king of Jordan, and sending a public message about this crisis? Reporter: That's right. Pelosi leading a delegation of Democrats and Republicans to meet with the king of Jordan. There's real concern about a resurgent ISIS and for the kurds. And no doubt sending a message of congressional unity against

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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