World's oldest man, a Japanese grandpa with a sweet tooth, turns 113
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WATCH: Masazo Nonaka celebrated in his hometown of Ashoro, Japan.

The world's oldest living man, who attributes his longevity to soaking in hot springs and eating sweets, turned 113 Wednesday.

Masazo Nonaka celebrated the milestone with his family in his hometown of Ashoro, on the Japanese island of Hokkaido. Nonaka blew out the cake and ate some of it like he does every birthday, but this year the cake had a “113” candle on top, his granddaughter Yuko Nonaka said.

He enjoys eating cakes, watching sumo wrestling on television and reading newspapers, Guinness World Records reported in April when it certified him as the world’s oldest living man, at age 112 years, 259 days.

Japanese Masazo Nonaka eats his favorite cake as he receives a Guinness World Records certificate naming him the world's oldest man during a ceremony in Ashoro, on Japan's northern island of Hokkaido, April 10, 2018.

His granddaughter believes the secret to his longevity is his "free lifestyle,” she told ABC News.

"Freedom is important to Masazo. He’s lived the way he wanted to live and has always done what he wanted to do,” she said.

The man used to run his family's 105-year-old hot springs inn, which is now managed by his granddaughter, the Associated Press reported.

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Nonaka said her grandfather received many sweets and gifts this year for his 113th birthday.

She also said the family is very happy for him. "We’re a close family and family is quite important to him,” she added.

Masazo succeeded Francisco Nunez Olivera of Spain, the previous oldest man in the world when he died in January.

The world's oldest living person is a Japanese woman named Kane Tanaka, who is 115 years and 204 days old, according to the Gerontology Research Group, a group devoted to reversing age-related decline, according to its website.

Guinness World Records has not yet confirmed the oldest living person.