5 natural disasters that devastated the US in 2018
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WATCH: The nation saw multiple, unprecedented natural disasters this year, from the deadliest wildfire in California's history to the worst hurricane to hit the East Coast since 1969.

The nation saw multiple, unprecedented natural disasters this year, from the deadliest wildfire in California's history to the worst hurricane to hit the East Coast since 1969.

Reports from the National Centers for Environmental Information have found that climate change plays a major role in causing natural disasters to be more intense, destructive and costly to the country, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration spokesperson told ABC News. Hurricanes Michael and Florence both set records in several states.

"Climate change increases the probability that you're going to see these kinds of storms," Dr. David Easterling, a physical scientist with NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information, said of hurricanes Florence and Michael.

"The fact that Florence brought so much flooding was likely due to the warmer atmosphere," Easterling explained, and while an individual hurricane "is not necessarily due to climate change," he said an increase in strength -- like the record high winds seen in Michael -- can be linked to climate change.

A volunteer pries wood flooring from the storm damaged home of Tonja Dais in Pollocksville, N.C., Sept. 28, 2018. Davis' home was flooded with several feet of water from Hurricane Florence. Photo Credit: Gray Whitley/Sun Journal via AP
Furniture and household items are piled next to the curb as residents and volunteers work to clear debris from storm damaged homes in Pollocksville,located near the Trent River, in N.C., Sept. 28, 2018. Photo Credit: Gray Whitley/Sun Journal via AP
In this Sept. 24, 2018 photo, flood waters from the Neuse River cover the area in Kinston, N.C., a week after Hurricane Florence struck. Photo Credit: Ken Blevins/The Star-News via AP
Pastor Willie Lowrimore of The Fellowship With Jesus Ministries talks about the flooding of his church in Yauhannah, S.C., Sept. 24, 2018. The church is on the bank of the Waccamaw River which has already risen... Photo Credit: Jeffrey S. Collins/AP
This Sept. 22, 2018, shows fish left on Interstate 40 in Pender County in eastern North Carolina after floodwaters receded. Thousands of coastal residents remained on edge Sunday, told they may need to leave th... Photo Credit: Jeff Garrett/AP
Jason Johnson, left, and homeowner Archie Sanders work to build a temporary levee to hold back floodwaters caused by Hurricane Florence near the Waccamaw River on Sept. 23, 2018 in Conway, South Carolina. Flood... Photo Credit: Sean Rayford/Getty Images
People navigate floodwaters caused by Hurricane Florence near the Waccamaw River on Sept. 23, 2018 in Conway, South Carolina. Floodwaters are expected to continue to rise in Conway over the next two days. Photo Credit: Sean Rayford/Getty Images
Flooded homes, roads and fields pass under a Jayhawk helicopter during a U.S. Coast Guard search-and-rescue operation, over North Carolina, Sept. 18, 2018. Coast Guard crews airlifted both people and pets to sa... Photo Credit: Hilary Swift/The New York Times/Redux
President Donald Trump hugs a young man while handing out prepackaged meals at Temple Baptist Church in an area impacted by Hurricane Florence, Sept. 19, 2018, in New Bern, N.C. Photo Credit: Evan Vucci/AP
Ronnie Gainey carries an electric guitar through the floodwaters of Black Creek from his home in Darlington South Carolina, Sept. 18, 2018, during the aftermath of Hurricane Florence. Photo Credit: Scott Muthersbaugh/Perfecta Visuals/Polaris
Iva Williamson, 4, peers behind her as she joins neighbors and pets in fleeing rising flood waters in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence in Leland, North Carolina, Sept. 16, 2018. Photo Credit: Jonathan Drake/Reuters
Mary and Phil Pongonis look at the damaged roadway from Hurricane Florence in Boiling Spring Lakes, N.C., Sept. 18, 2018. Photo Credit: Ken Blevins/The Star-News/AP
A cat clings to the side of a trailer in the flood waters before it was saved as the Northeast Cape Fear River overflowed its banks in the aftermath Hurricane Florence in Burgaw, N.C., Sept. 17, 2018. Photo Credit: Jonathan Drake/Reuters
Dianna Wood, embraces her husband, Lynn, while looking out over their flooded property as the Little River continues to rise in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence in Linden, North Carolina, Sept. 18, 2018. &qu... Photo Credit: David Goldman/AP
A car sits in a flooded parking lot at an apartment complex near the Cape Fear River as it continues to rise in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence in Fayetteville, Sept. 18, 2018. Photo Credit: David Goldman/AP
An official looks out a helicopter at homes surrounded by flood waters in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence, Sept. 17, 2018, in Conway, S.C. Photo Credit: Sean Rayford/Getty Images
Two people sit on the roof of a vehicle trapped in floodwaters from Hurricane Florence, Sept. 17, 2018 in Wallace, S.C. Photo Credit: Sean Rayford/Getty Images
Bob Richling carries Iris Darden as water from the Little River starts to seep into her home, Sept. 17, 2018 in Spring Lake, N.C. Photo Credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Jimmy Shackleford transports his son Jim Shackleford and his wife Lisa, and their pets, in the bucket of his tractor as the Northeast Cape Fear River overflows its banks during flooding after Hurricane Florence... Photo Credit: Jonathan Drake/Reuters
Panicked dogs that were left caged by an owner who fled rising flood waters in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence, are rescued by volunteer rescuer Ryan Nichols of Longview, Texas, in Leland, N.C., Sept. 16, 2... Photo Credit: Jonathan Drake/Reuters
Floodwaters from Hurricane Florence rush down Cool Spring Street, inundating the St. James Church in Fayetteville, N.C. on 16 Sept. 2018. The Cape Fear River Valley, like many other river systems in eastern Nor... Photo Credit: Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/REX via Shutterstock
Members of the North Carolina Task Force urban search and rescue team check cars in a flooded neighborhood looking for residents who stayed behind as Florence continues to dump heavy rain in Fayetteville, N.C.,... Photo Credit: David Goldman/AP
Oliver Kelly, 1, cries as he is carried off the sheriff's airboat during his rescue from rising flood waters in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence in Leland, North Carolina, Sept. 16, 2018. Photo Credit: Jonathan Drake/Reuters
Michelle Tate speaks with Red Cross volunteer Jennifer McQuilken at the Red Cross shelter in the East Mecklenburg High School gymnasium, in Charlotte, N.C., Sept. 16, 2018. The Carolinas were drenched and large... Photo Credit: Alyssa Schukar/The New York Times/Redux
Hog farm buildings are inundated with floodwater from Hurricane Florence near Trenton, N.C., Sept. 16, 2018. Photo Credit: Steve Helber/AP
A boat lays smashed against a car garage, deposited there by the high winds and storm surge from Hurricane Florence along the Neuse River, Sept. 15, 2018, in New Bern, N.C. Photo Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Waves crash over the road over washed by Hurricane Florence in Ocracoke, NC., Sept. 15, 2018. Photo Credit: Steve Helber/AP
Joseph Eudi looks at flood debris and storm damage from Hurricane Florence at a home on East Front Street in New Bern, N.C., Sept. 15, 2018. Photo Credit: Gray Whitley/Sun Journal via AP
A farm house is surrounded by flooded fields from tropical storm Florence in Hyde County, N.C., Sept. 15, 2018. Photo Credit: Steve Helber/AP
A woman makes her way to her home that is surrounded by flood waters after Hurricane Florence passed through the area on Sept. 15, 2018, in Southport, N.C. Photo Credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Boats are stacked up on each other in a marina as a result from Florence in New Bern, N.C., Sept. 15, 2018. Photo Credit: Steve Helber/AP
The courtyard at Queen's Point condos is filled with residents' belongings after the storm surge from Hurricane Florence tore open the lower floors with a four-foot high storm surge on Sept. 15, 2018, in New Be... Photo Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
A woman searches through belongings in her garage after a four-foot storm surge produced by Hurricane Florence ripped through the Queen's Point condos along the Nuese River in New Bern, N.C., Sept. 15, 2018. Photo Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
A Lumberton firefighter holds on to two nursing home patients as a member of the Cajun Navy drives his truck during the evacuation of a nursing home due to rising flood waters in Lumberton, N.C., on Sept. 15, 2... Photo Credit: Alex Edelman/AFP/Getty Images
Two people in a canoe paddle through a street that was flooded by Hurricane Florence north of New Bern, N.C. on Sept. 15, 2018. Storm surge and heavy flooding from the hurricane has inundated much of Eastern No... Photo Credit: Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/REX via Shutterstock
Members of NC Task Force 10, comprised of the New Bern and Greenville fire departments, search for residents in the Duffyfield neighborhood of New Bern, N.C., Sept. 15, 2018. Florence, the powerful storm that h... Photo Credit: Victor J. Blue/The New York Times/Redux
Storm damage caused by high winds is seen on Ocean Avenue as the outer bands of Hurricane Florence make landfall on Sept. 14, 2018, in Myrtle Beach, S.C. Photo Credit: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images
An abandoned car's hazard lights continue to flash as it sits submerged in rising flood waters during pre-dawn hours after Hurricane Florence struck in Wilmington, N.C., Sept. 15, 2018. Photo Credit: Jonathan Drake/Reuters
High winds and heavy rain limit visibility as a North Carolina National Guard truck crosses the bridge over the Neuse River during Hurricane Florence on Sept. 14, 2018, in New Bern, N.C. Photo Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Robert Simmons Jr. and his kitten "Survivor" are rescued from floodwaters after Hurricane Florence dumped several inches of rain in the area overnight, Sept. 14, 2018 in New Bern, N.C. Photo Credit: Andrew Carter/The News & Observer via AP
People sit at a bar that has no power and drink during a "Hurricane Party" as Hurricane Florence comes ashore on Wilmington, North Carolina, Sept. 14, 2018. Photo Credit: Carlo Allegri/Reuters
From left, Nash Fralick, Michael Jenkins and Ethan Hall examine damage to Tidewater Brewing Co. in Wilmington, N.C., after Hurricane Florence made landfall, Sept. 14, 2018. Photo Credit: Chuck Burton/AP
Eric Edwards Jr., left, and Elliott Farmer Jr. look at their phones from a blow up mattress at a storm shelter at Washington Street United Methodist Church as Florence slowly moves across the East Coast Friday,... Photo Credit: Sean Rayford/AP
Debris from Hurricane Florence covers a street in downtown New Bern, N.C., Sept. 14, 2018. Photo Credit: Chris Seward/AP
Rescue workers from Township No. 7 Fire Department and volunteers from the Civilian Crisis Response Team help rescue a woman and her dog from their flooded home during Hurricane Florence, Sept. 14, 2018, in Jam... Photo Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Volunteer Amber Hersel from the Civilian Crisis Response Team helps rescue 7-year-old Keiyana Cromartie and her family from their flooded home, Sept. 14, 2018, in James City, N.C. Photo Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Waves slam the Oceana Pier & Pier House Restaurant in Atlantic Beach, N.C., Sept. 13, 2018 as Hurricane Florence approaches the area. Photo Credit: Travis Long/The News & Observer via AP
Hurricane Florence is seen through a super wide angle lens from the International Space Station, Sept. 12, 2018. Photo Credit: ESA/NASA

"We expect to see not necessarily more... but the ones that we do have are going to be more powerful," Easterling said. "You're going to have stronger winds and heavier rain. And on top of that, as sea level continue to rise, then storm surge from those storms will also get worse."

Increasingly powerful storms can mean both higher death tolls and more devastation. In the fourth National Climate Assessment released on Nov. 23, 13 federal agencies estimated that the the U.S. could lose as much as 10 percent of its GDP by the end of the century.

Here is a look back at the human and financial toll of five of the biggest natural disasters to devastate the U.S. in 2018.

January: Montecito mudslides

Crews pump mud on Highway 101 after a mudslide, Jan. 13, 2018, in Montecito, Calif.

Rain and mudslides hit wildfire-scarred areas of Montecito, California, in January, flattening homes and covering freeways. Twenty-one people were killed, including children and the elderly.

Montecito saw more than half an inch of rain fall in just five minutes. When rain falls at a rate of more than 0.4 inches per hour, it can cause debris flow, especially in fire-scarred areas where soil may be looser, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

Actor Rob Lowe, who lives in Montecito, described it as a "perfect storm of bad events."

In this Jan. 15, 2018 image from video provided by the Santa Barbara County Fire Department, the U.S. 101 freeway remains underwater as clean-up crews work to clear the roads throughout Montecito, Calif., following the deadly mudflow and flooding Jan. 9.

Lowe, who wasn't home at the time, told the "The Ellen DeGeneres Show" he received a video call from his son, who was at the house.

"Fires [were] everywhere, because gas lines were rupturing," Lowe said, describing the picture his son showed him. "It was like 'Armageddon.'"

"People who saw the fires, they woke up, went out to see what was going on, and then were washed away," he said on the January show. "The sadness ... I can't kind of get beyond it."

May: Maryland flooding

Flash flooding devastated historic Ellicott City in May, with residents and tourists scrambling to flee streets that turned into raging rivers.

Water rushes through Main Street in Ellicott City, Md., May 27, 2018.

More than 8 inches of rain fell there in just a few hours.

Megan Clark, the owner of a local toy store, was at work when the water "burst" through, rising from her ankles to her waist in minutes, she told ABC News.

Maryland National Guardsman and Air Force veteran Eddison Hermond was at an Ellicott City restaurant at the time, and he jumped into help. He was swept away to his death.

Rescue personnel examine damage on Main Street after a flash flood rushed through the historic town of Ellicott City, Md., May 27, 2018. The National Weather Service stated as much as 9.5 inches of rain fell in the area, May 27, 2018.

Howard County County Executive Allan Kittleman said the 2018 flood was worse than the one that hit Ellicott City two years before. In the 2016 flood, two people were killed and the city suffered millions of dollars in damages.

"My heart's broken when I walk through the town and see it," Kittleman told "Good Morning America" in May. "All I'm thinking about is the folks whose lives have been devastated for a second time in two years."

September: Hurricane Florence

At least 43 people died in Hurricane Florence, which flooded the Carolinas in September.

North Carolina was hit with 36 inches of rain and South Carolina got 24 inches -- both surpassing statewide records.

North Carolina's Cape Fear River reached an all-time high level of 8.27 feet in Wilmington, surpassing its previous record of 8.2 feet, which was set during Hurricane Matthew in 2016.

A Department of Natural Resources officer, left, and a South Carolina Law Enforcement agent walk through floodwaters caused by Hurricane Florence near the Todd Swamp, Sept. 21, 2018, in Longs, South Carolina.
People navigate floodwaters caused by Hurricane Florence near the Waccamaw River, Sept. 23, 2018, in Conway, S.C.

Beaufort, North Carolina resident Sara Felton and her husband were among the many whose homes were destroyed.

They waded through ankle-deep mud and marshland to return to their trailer only to discover the windows were blown out and the living room ceiling had collapsed.

"I've never seen my husband cry before, and he was just in tears," she said. "Everything was underwater."

"Our entire deck," she added, "it's like it just got lifted up and the sky just swallowed it."

Felton said when she went to her daughter's bedroom, "We could just feel the floors, it was about to collapse. We couldn't even step into the room."

"Our whole entire place was just destroyed," she said.

October: Hurricane Michael

Ferocious and historic Hurricane Michael left a trail of destruction across Florida, Georgia and the Carolinas in October, becoming the strongest storm -- based on pressure -- to hit the U.S. since Hurricane Camille in 1969.

Michael also brought the strongest winds seen since Hurricane Andrew in 1992.

Damaged boats sit among debris in a marina in the aftermath of Hurricane Michael in Panama City, Fla., Oct. 12, 2018.

It was also the first Category 4 hurricane to ever make landfall on the Florida Panhandle and "the worst storm" that area has ever seen, Florida Gov. Rick Scott said.

The hurricane devastated Panama City, Florida, and nearly demolished the small town of Mexico Beach.

Members of the Maryland Task Force urban search and rescue team continue to search for victims of Hurricane Michael, Oct. 16, 2018, in Mexico Beach, Fla.

Michael sounded like a freight train when it barreled into Panama City with 150 mph winds, resident Jackie Lane told ABC News.

Lane, her husband and her son rode out the storm in the second story of an inn down the street from their home. She and her son raced into the bathtub, she said, as her husband sat on the floor and put his feet up against the bathroom door.

"It was already splitting," she said of the door, her voice shaking, "and the roof came, the ceiling came off."

"For about three hours it just sucked us in and sucked us out, sucked us in and sucked us out," she said. "I thought I was gonna lose my husband 'cause the door was cracking. And the stove and refrigerator that was in there, we could hear them just banging together and clanging around. We seen the stove fly across us. We seen all the debris, trees, pieces of everything."

"We're lucky to have our lives," she said.

After wreaking havoc in Florida, Michael swept north, becoming the first major hurricane (a Category 3 or higher) to track into Georgia since 1898.

Michael also blew through the Carolinas, which were still reeling from Hurricane Florence just a month earlier, before blowing through Virginia.

Michael killed 43 in Florida and at least 10 people in other states.

November: California wildfires

Firefighters work to keep flames from spreading through the Shadowbrook apartment complex as a wildfire burns through Paradise, Calif., Nov. 9, 2018.

Unprecedented wildfires swept through the Golden State in November, from the Camp Fire in Northern California to the Woolsey Fire in Southern California.

While three died in the Woolsey Fire, 85 people were killed in the Camp Fire, which has become the deadliest in California history.

While the cause of the Camp Fire remains under investigation, the blaze was kindled by unusually warm temperatures, wind and drought. Easterling, the NOAA scientist, said climate change has contributed to the Golden State's years of drought.

The Camp Fire destroyed more than 150,000 acres, over 13,000 homes and nearly demolished the town of Paradise as residents fled for their lives.

Residences leveled by the wildfire line a neighborhood in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 15, 2018.

Among those running for safety was Nichole Jolly, a nurse at a hospital in Paradise, who looked to save herself after she finished evacuating her critically sick patients.

She started driving but "the fire was blowing in so fast."

A search and rescue team combs through the debris for possible human remains at Paradise Gardens in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 16, 2018. Photo Credit: Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times/Polaris
Firefighters move debris while recovering human remains from a trailer home destroyed by the Camp Fire in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 17, 2018. Photo Credit: Terray Sylvester/Reuters
Residences leveled by the wildfire line a neighborhood in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 15, 2018. Photo Credit: Noah Berger/AP
An undated handout photo made available by the United States Forest Service and the National Wildfire Coordinating Group, Nov. 20, 2018, shows firefighters battling the Camp Fire in Northern California. Photo Credit: Handout/EPA via Shutterstock
President Donald Trump visits the charred wreckage of Skyway Villa Mobile Home and RV Park with Governor-elect Gavin Newsom, left, Brock Long, right, Paradise Mayor Jody Jones (2nd R) and Governor Jerry Brown i... Photo Credit: Leah Millis/Reuters
Lane and Julie Walker, of Magalia, look for people they know on a list of people missing in the aftermath of the Camp Fire in Chico, Calif., Nov. 15, 2018. Photo Credit: Terray Sylvester/Reuters
Members of the California Army National Guard take a break at they search burned homes for human remains in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 15, 2018. Photo Credit: John Locher/AP
A view from above of a burned out neighborhood in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 15, 2018. The Camp Fire, which wiped out the town of Paradise, became the state's deadliest on record. Photo Credit: Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images
Firefighters carry a body bag with human remains discovered at a mobile home park destroyed by the Camp Fire, Nov. 14, 2018 in Paradise, Calif. Photo Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Denise Chester, an evacuee of the Camp Fire, hugs her son Antonio as she volunteers at a makeshift shelter in Chico, Calif., on Nov. 14, 2018. Chester, who wasn't ready to learn whether her home survived, said ... Photo Credit: Noah Berger/AP
Search teams gather outside the Tall Pines Entertainment Center during a briefing before beginning cadaver search operations for the day in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 14, 2018. Photo Credit: Joel Angel Juarez/ZUMA Press
Yellow caution tape marks the spot where human remains were discovered at a mobile home park that was destroyed by the Camp Fire on Nov. 14, 2018 in Paradise, Calif. Photo Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
The Woolsey Fire burns in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, Nov. 13, 2018, in Newbury, Calif. Photo Credit: Rob Schumacher/The Republic via USA Today Network
Search and rescue workers search for human remains at a trailer park burned by the Camp Fire, Nov. 13, 2018, in Paradise, Calif. Photo Credit: John Locher/AP
An air tanker drops water on a fire along the Ronald Reagan (118) Freeway in Simi Valley, Calif., Nov. 12, 2018. Photo Credit: Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP
Homes leveled by the Camp Fire line a development on Edgewood Lane in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 12, 2018. Photo Credit: Noah Berger/AP
A firefighter battles a fire along the Ronald Reagan Freeway, aka state Highway 118, in Simi Valley, Calif., Nov. 12, 2018. Photo Credit: Ringo H.W. Chi/AP
Rubble remains where mobile homes once stood at the Camp Fire, Nov. 12, 2018, in Paradise, Calif. Photo Credit: John Locher/AP
A home destroyed by the Woolsey Fire is seen in Thousand Oaks, California, Nov. 12, 2018. Photo Credit: Eric Thayer/Reuters
Members of the Sacramento County Coroner's office look for human remains in the rubble of a house burned at the Camp Fire, Nov. 12, 2018, in Paradise, Calif. Photo Credit: John Locher/AP
A huge cloud of smoke from wildfires hangs over Malibu, Calif., Nov. 9, 2018. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Ben Watkins via AP
Firefighter Jose Corona sprays water as flames consume from the Camp Fire consume a home in Magalia, Calif., Nov. 9, 2018. Photo Credit: Noah Berger/AP
Capt. Adrian Murrieta with the Los Angeles County Fire Dept., looks for hot spots on a wildfire-ravaged home, Nov. 10, 2018, in Malibu, Calif. Photo Credit: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP
The Camp Fire burns along a ridge near Big Bend, Calif., Nov. 10, 2018. Photo Credit: Stephen Lam/Reuters
Yolo County Sheriff's Office Animal officer Tim Share rescues an injured horse following the Camp Fire in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 10, 2018. Photo Credit: Gabrielle Lurie/San Francisco Chronicle/Polaris
Smoke darkens the sky as the Woolsey Fire burns in Malibu, Calif., Nov. 9, 2018. Photo Credit: Eric Thayer/Reuters
Firefighters Jason Toole, right, and Brent McGill with the Santa Barbara Fire Dept. walk among the ashes of a wildfire-ravaged home after turning off an open gas line, Nov. 10, 2018, in Malibu, Calif. Photo Credit: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP
A home is engulfed in flames during the Woolsey Fire in Malibu, Calif., Nov. 9, 2018. Photo Credit: Gene Blevins/Reuters
As the Camp Fire burns nearby, a scorched car rests by gas pumps near Pulga, Calif., Nov. 11, 2018. Photo Credit: Noah Berger/AP
A deer walks past a destroyed home on Orrin Lane after the wildfire burned through Paradise, Calif., Nov. 10, 2018. Photo Credit: Noah Berger/AP
A vehicle drives through smoke from a wildfire near Pulga, Calif., Nov. 11, 2018. Photo Credit: Noah Berger/AP
Equine veterinarian Jesse Jellison carries an injured goose to transport during the Camp Fire in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 10, 2018. Photo Credit: Stephen Lam/Reuters
Roger Bloxberg and his wife Anne hug as they watch a wildfire on a hilltop near their home, Nov. 9, 2018, in West Hills, Calif. Photo Credit: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP
Firefighters push down a wall while battling a fire in an apartment complex in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 9, 2018. Photo Credit: Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images
Paradise resident and Camp Fire evacuee Christine Fitzsimmons, 50, gets emotional while sitting with her dog at the Red Cross shelter in Chico, Calif., Nov. 9, 2018. Photo Credit: Gabrielle Lurie/San Francisco Chronicle via Polaris
A house burns during the Woolsey Fire on Nov. 9, 2018 in Malibu, Calif. Photo Credit: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images
Krystin Harvey, left, comforts her daughter Araya Cipollini at the remains of their home burned in the Camp Fire, Nov. 10, 2018, in Paradise, Calif. Photo Credit: John Locher/AP
A wildfire burns in Camarillo, Calif., near Highway 101, Nov. 8, 2018. Photo Credit: CBS2/KCAL9 via AP
Medical personnel evacuate patients as the Feather River Hospital burns while the Camp Fire rages through Paradise, Calif., Nov. 8, 2018. Photo Credit: Noah Berger/AP
Horses are tied to lifeguard booths on the beach in Malibu, Calif., Nov. 10, 2018. Wildfires are burning in both Southern and Northern California. Photo Credit: Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP
Power lines rest on cars that were burned by the Camp Fire on Nov. 10, 2018 in Paradise, Calif. Photo Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Firefighters work to keep flames from spreading through the Shadowbrook apartment complex as a wildfire burns through Paradise, Calif., Nov. 9, 2018. Photo Credit: Noah Berger/AP
A store burns as the Camp Fire tears through Paradise, Calif., Nov. 8, 2018. Photo Credit: Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

"There was sparks and flames hitting the side of my car," she told ABC News. "My car started to fill up with smoke."

"I knew I was gonna die if I stayed in my car," she said, so she jumped out.

With her pants on fire, she tried to take shelter in a colleague's car. But when that car filled with smoke, Jolly said she got out and started running.

The sky was pitch black, Jolly said, and the air burned her lungs.

"I thought I was gonna die right there," she recalled. "There was no oxygen."

Then out of the darkness, she said, a fire truck appeared. Two firemen extinguished her pants, put a fire blanket over her and lifted her into the truck, she said.

Though Jolly's home was destroyed in the blaze, "it can all be replaced," she said.

"I'm alive and I thought I was gonna die multiple times, so, it's just stuff," she said. "My life, my kids' life, my mom's life, my husband, that can't be replaced."

ABC News' Melissa Griffin and Max Golembo contributed to this report.