What's the impact of Jared Kushner's comments on Black Americans?

"The View" co-hosts and guest co-host Bari Weiss weigh in on Kushner's comment that Black Americans have to “want to be successful” for President Donald Trump's policies to work.
5:59 | 10/27/20

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for What's the impact of Jared Kushner's comments on Black Americans?
Yesterday white house senior adviser Jared Kushner was talking up how much this administration has done for the black community and claimed that you can't blame his father-in-law for not putting in the effort. Take a look. One thing we've seen in a lot of the blam community, which is mostly Democrat, is that president trump's policies are the policies that can help people break out of the problems they're complaining about. He can't want them to be successful more than they want to be successful. You're see a ground swell support in the black community because they're seeing everything the media says president trump is not true. Boy, am I getting tiredf hearing this crap from anybody who don't know anything about what's going on. Let me not me a bonehead. How are black voters going to react to that statement, sunny? Being the black woman on the panel I'll ask you. Well, I think the fact that Jared Kushner is trafficking in racial tropes that have been used by people for such a long time -- Over and over again. Claiming that black people aren't successful because they're lazy isn't going to bode well for the Republican party so close to the election when you have the stats are black eligible voters now make up 12.5% of the U.S. Electorate and a peer research survey found that 63% of black registered voters are ext motivated to vote. The other thing is you look at the messenger, you have somebody like Jared Kushner who is only in the white house because his father-in-law placed him there. He's woefully unqualified to be there. He got into Harvard because his father paid $2.5 million to get him there. Someone who has made it only because people have paid for his position and appointed him to positions has no business talking about success in any way, shape or form. I'm just really surprised that he would do so -- well, I shouldn't be surprised he would say something like that. It's probably emblematic of what the white house thinks about black Americans and thinks about their black constituent. It's very telling what he said on fox. What was your reaction to hearing this, Sara, when you heard it? Did it -- were you surprised? Well, it was detached, extremely tone deaf. I don't think the black community has been a focus of this administration. I conveniently find we're talking about it right now in the throws of an election. There's a L rattling off of points about black colleges. They had some talking points and he would have been better Ng to those. Off script doesn't work well for him. Language reveals your thought when he says complaining about, he's speaking to how they view what the black community has spoken up about. There are extremely valid points that you can't really argue with. To say complaining sounds like they're throwing something at a whiney toddler. To me I found that the most off-putting about what he was saying. I don't think this helped. If they were going with more votes with the black community, this was not the way to get them. What about you, Bari, when you heard him sort of laying all these things out, prosecuting the clan and making lynching a national hate crime which they could have done a couple years ago, but they didn't? What do you think he was saying? Well, sometimes it feels like this administration wants to lose the election and watching a moment like that you're kind of thinking is this their closing I mean, it's baffling to me. Like everyone said, it was utterly tone deaf. Is that a rise? Not a surprise. Charlemaine the god had an interesting interview on CNN. He talked about how trump is successfully courting, not older black voters, but younger black voters. There was a recent poll that found that black voters between the ages of 18 and 44 their support for trump has jumped from 10% to 21%. It's still a very low number. I thought that was interesting to say nothing of Jared kushutter tone deafness which three and a half years in we shouldn't be surprised by. I don't think trump has 21% ck voters. I would like to see that poll. Who are those 21% of black Listen, he may, but here's what he -- here'st is wrong for me. If you want people to stop bitching about stuff, then do something about it. You want people to stop saying, hey, stop shooting us, then stop shooting us. You want to understand what's going on into the black community, ask the white folks that are marching with all these black lives matter kids. They're saying we get. Why don't you? It's a whole thing. You know, so, when you talk about what you're going to do for the black community, don't tell me you're going to pass this law or that law because you had the opportunity to do that. What I want you to do is address the issues. When you do this, this is like a fart in the dust storm. It's gone.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"duration":"5:59","description":"\"The View\" co-hosts and guest co-host Bari Weiss weigh in on Kushner's comment that Black Americans have to “want to be successful” for President Donald Trump's policies to work.","mediaType":"default","section":"ABCNews/theview","id":"73858895","title":"What's the impact of Jared Kushner's comments on Black Americans?","url":"/theview/video/impact-jared-kushners-comments-black-americans-73858895"}