Why Are Parents Buying Their Girls the Gift of Surgery?

Jennifer wasn't bothered by the possibility of complications. "Well, then I had one to three years of my life where I felt great about myself, and you can't take that back," she said.

'Quick Fixes' for Problems Kids Should Work Through

Why would a parent pay for an operation that is risky and medically unnecessary?

"It's really fun to give things to your kids and to say yes and to have them like you," said psychotherapist Laura Gray, who specializes in treating teens. She said it's a parent's job to teach kids that, despite what popular culture says, a better body is not the route to happiness.

I told her how happy Jennifer was in our interview. It was almost like a commercial for the surgery. She's more outgoing. It's changed her personality for the better. Some people who see the interview are going to think, "I want to be that happy."

But Gray said her question for Jennifer would be: "What was happening for you that was so difficult in life that you were unable to manage it without having breast implants?"

Gray said it's a question parents should ask instead of buying their daughters what they hope will be a quick fix.

"What I see today a lot is parents who cannot bear for their kids to be uncomfortable. They do not want them to suffer. They don't want them to struggle," she said.

Why should they suffer, if their parents can afford to give them things, like implants, that will make them happy?

Jennifer said she was unhappy and didn't feel good about herself with her size A breasts.

"I would have to say, let's talk about that or what's that like for you. That's what I would encourage a parent to do instead of immediately jumping to their checkbook and saying, 'Let me fix this for you,'" Gray said.

Gray said when parents try to fix everything, kids don't develop resilience and coping skills.

"Later in life, my hope is they'll draw on some of those skills and say, 'You know what? I remember a time when things were really hard or really awful or I felt terrible about myself. But I got through it and I did OK,'" she said.

Dr. Stephen Greenberg, who performed Catherine and Jennifer's surgeries, won't operate on kids under 18.

"We have to be the ones to say, 'No, you're not ready -- psychologically, you're not old enough. Let's just wait,'" he said.

Peers Differ on Implants and Self-Confidence

Curious what other teens would think about getting the gift of new breasts, we played a clip of my interview with Jennifer for some students at a suburban high school.

"That is saying to your child, well, maybe you aren't as beautiful as you are," one boy said.

"I think it's really sad that our society has come to the place where to make a teenage girl happy, you need to spend thousands of dollars increasing her breast size. When she was obviously a beautiful girl before," a girl in the group told us.

Another girl agreed, saying, "I think she should have had a little more confidence. Breast implants should not change your life that drastically."

On the other hand, some of the kids thought it was just fine.

"That feeling of confidence could stay with her," one girl said.

Another girl told us she thought the girls' surgeries were OK since their parents could afford it. "They have the money to do so and the means to do so and there's really nothing wrong about giving their child what they want," she said.

Kara, who had had a nose job, told us she understands why implants would make a girl more confident.

"I had plastic surgery. So I know that it made me happy inside," she said.

Jennifer admitted it's difficult to describe why breast implants would boost her confidence. "It's something so hard to explain, how something so materialistic and stupid can just make someone feel so much better about themselves," she said.

Materialistic and stupid sounds right to me.

"But it's what I wanted," Jennifer said. "And it's something that's going to make me happy, and I don't have any regrets at all."

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