Family, Friends Seek Justice Post-Murder Trial

Act 5: The jury justifies their verdict, and meanwhile, Johnson's murderer remains free.
3:00 | 06/06/14

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

More information on this video
Enhanced full screen
Explore related content
Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Family, Friends Seek Justice Post-Murder Trial
"20/20" continues. Here again, Jim Avila. Reporter: Lucy Johnson's 34th birthday, if she had lived. And for her fiance, Mike mead, judgment day. The jury announces they have reached a verdict after nearly nine hours deliberation. Well, I am always terrified while I am waiting for a jury. You can never be sure. People ask criminal defense attorneys all the time, "How can you defend somebody that you know is guilty?" Trust me, it is much harder to defend someone when you truly believe they are innocent. Reporter: And here it is. The verdict. Michael mead, not guilty. Members of the jury, thank you very much for your work on this case. Reporter: Not guilty on all counts. Mike mead goes from dead man walking to find me the nearest exit. Just thank god that I'm here. I fully expected not guilty. Reporter: Why were you not surprised when they said not guilty? Because I had set in the same trial for seven weeks that they had. Reporter: And? And if it was sitting on that jury, I would have been going, you know, what in the world is going on with this case? Reporter: So "20/20" gathered 11 jurors and returned them to their cemenseats in the same courtroom, for their first group interview, where it was clear that the defense strategy worked. I don't understand how they were able to come to trial to not even give a second look at Jim spelock. Reporter: A key element for the jury -- Lucy's own words in her journal. So Lucy Johnson, herself, told you, a juror, Jim spelock did it. If anything were to happen to me, spelock did it. I mean, she wrote it down. He wanted that son named after him, and she wouldn't do it. Reporter: And they thought spelock had motive. The women's clothing Lucy said he bought for himself. James spelock was backed into a corner at this point. I think -- desperate, in that he needed to stop that from being out in public. Reporter: The jurors tell us, in all of Lucy's messages from the grave, they found not one word against Mike mead. There was never any entry in any of her journals about him doing anything aggressive to her at all. I thought the state was really grasping at straws. The evidence was overwhelming, as far as Mike mead not doing it. Reporter: And that's hard to hear, isn't it? That's hard to hear. Reporter: The jurors saved their harshest criticism for the police. Comparing them to a classic fictional North Carolina law enforcement bafoon. I called him Barney fife, in my mind. We got a bunch of Barney fifes. I think Barney was smarter. They didn't have a clue. They blew it. And I think that's what bother mes about this case the most. And we do have a horrendous murder case, that has not been solved. It believes you wondering. Reporter: So whether it was bad police work or prosecuting the wrong man, or perhaps the perfect crime that allowed Mike mead to get away with murder, one thing for sure -- no one thinks Lucy Johnson got justice. Since Mike mead has been tried and acquitted, and since you don't believe that there's anybody else out there that could have done the crime, Lucy will never get justice, in you mind. Not in my mind. Reporter: Today, Jim spelock has full custody of his son Cason, who after Lucy's death, he renamed James spelock iii. Mike mead says although he is free, he lives under a cloud of suspici suspicion. We interviewed Meeks, okay? To this day he thinks you did it. Well, to this day he's an idiot. Where there's smoke, there's fire. The evidence is clear. I have no respect for Meeks. So, you know, what Meeks thinks I don't really care. What I think matters is what the 15 jurors that heard the evidence think. Reporter: Mead has moved from south to North Carolina, trying to live a new life. Did it bother you that even though you were aacquitted, there are people to this day that believe you got away with murder? Well, sure. It's excruciating. Reporter: Right now, mead is in the middle of an open lawsuit charging his civil rights were violated, and he was falsely prosecuted by the Gaston county police. The police say they cannot comment on a pending legal matter. Do you ever close your eyes and think about like if none of this happened. Where would you life be with Lucy right now? Do you do that? Oh, yeah, of course. Yeah, I would have a wife, a beautiful wife, a little boy, yeah. Reporter: You miss her? Yeah, I miss her. Reporter: The home where Lucy lived and died, today, just a vacant lot. A driveway that leads to nowhere. Like the dead end investigation into her murder. Anything help at all? No. Just my faith in god, that one day, the person that did this will have to face him, face another judge. Reporter: Where all the evidence will be in. Right. Nothing's hidden from him.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"id":24038413,"title":"Family, Friends Seek Justice Post-Murder Trial","duration":"3:00","description":"Act 5: The jury justifies their verdict, and meanwhile, Johnson's murderer remains free.","section":"2020","mediaType":"Default"}