Two Sides of Mexico Clash in the #LadyProfeco Case

Tames pointed out that relatives of powerful politicians from other parties have also been involved in incidents where they made almost surreal displays of arrogance.

Back in 2009, for example, the son of a senator from Mexico's National Action Party tried to get into a club run by a friend of Tames'.

He was denied entry because he was too drunk and reacted by taking off his belt and whipping the bouncer of the club. But that was before iPhones and Androids were widely available in Mexico.

"Imagine what would've happened if someone took a video of that and put that up on social media," Tames said.

So will social media and the fear of being exposed change how the Mexican elite behave?

Luis Cesar Torres a sociologist at Mexico's National Pedagogical University said that tools like Twitter and smartphones can help to decrease corruption and abuse of power.

"Its good that we are watching each other [and watching the powerful]" said Torres, who has done several studies on the political impact of Twitter in Mexico.

But he added that social media cannot stamp out acts of corruption on its own. A judicial system that effectively punishes those who abuse of their power is also required for that, Torres said.

In the #ladyprofeco case, for instance, it is not certain yet whether Andrea Benitez or her father will receive any actual punishment for the unwarranted inspection and threats to shut down Maximo Bistrot.

Both have apologized via Twitter for what happened last week. And the embarrassment and shame brought about by this incident may well discourage Andrea Benitez from doing the same thing again.

But Torres thinks that this is not enough. "I think there must be consequences," he said. "If not, it is just a sensational story that goes by, it quiets down, and then maybe they will continue to do the same things."

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