Runaway Toyota Prius Driver: 'He Thought He Was Going to Die'

Michels said the data showed that Sikes must have applied repeated light pressure on the brakes rather than the full pressure needed to stop the car. He said that if Sikes had been applying more than moderate pressure on the brakes while the accelerator was pressed or stuck to the floor, the override system in the Prius would have been activated by the brake and shut off the acceleration.

After the press conference, however, a Toyota representative confirmed to ABC News that the electronic data did not show how hard the brake was being pressed. "The level of brake application is not recorded," said Toyota spokesman Brian Lyons, "only that the brakes were completely released and applied."

Lyons also clarified Michels statement about the number of times Sikes must have hit the brakes and the accelerator. He said that the data showed that Sikes pressed and released the brakes 254 times, and did not show Sikes pressing on the accelerator, only that the throttle remained open throughout the incident.

Asked at the press conference why the California Highway Patrol officer who helped Sikes bring his car to a stop reported seeing Sikes "standing" on the brakes, Michels said he assumed the officer's account was true.

CHP press spokesperson Brian Pennings told the Blotter that the department continues to believe Sikes' case was not a hoax. "Toyota has not presented any factual data to the Highway Patrol that would discredit Mr. Sikes' account," said Pennings. Pennings also noted that Toyota held its press conference without interviewing the officers at the scene and while a federal investigation into the case was continuing. "if they choose to do that, that's fine, but it's still ongoing," said Pennings.

James Sikes' attorney, John Gomez, said the tests did not replicate what his client had actually done while driving the car. He also said the tests did not provide evidence for those who believe Sikes faked the incident for profit or publicity.

The CHP report noted that Sikes was "very reluctant to speak to the media," and "refused to exit the ambulance" once he observed media on the scene. Neibert stated that he convinced Sikes to go to the CHP office "in order to put the media at ease," and advised him that "the media would most likely seek him out if he did not speak to them voluntarily."

"There is no reason whatsoever to believe it's a hoax," said Gomez. "And just to be clear, he is not filing a lawsuit, ever. He's not asking for money, ever. So there's no reason for him to make it up."

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