Texas 'Grave' Mistake: The Psychic Dilemma

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When Psychics Are Right... Kind of

Despite some public failings of psychics, Grabois said he was personally astounded by one back in the 1980s when he was investigating the disappearance of New York 6-year-old Etan Patz; not because the psychic was able to find the boy who had been missing since 1979, but because most of the other leads she described panned out. The woman, a schoolteacher referred to Grabois by a state official, knew things about locations she could not have seen before and even predicted children's clothes would be found in certain locations, Grabois said. She also gave an accurate description of the prime suspect in Patz's disappearance, a man currently in prison on other charges, he said.

Though the boy was not where the psychic said, she was so specific with other facts that Grabois "took a second look" at her as a possible accomplice in the case before clearing her of any involvement.

"To this day I still shake my head," he said. "I have no explanation for the accuracy of this woman."

Despite his experience, Grabois said he does not believe psychics generally help solve cases. Garrett said other investigators may disagree.

"There are detectives that state that psychics have helped them find people, they've helped them find bodies," Garrett said.

Sometimes, like in the case of an Australian psychic, it's just not the right body.

Last year an Aboriginal elder claimed she had a vision of a missing 6-year-old in a wooded area outside Syndey, according to a report by The Associated Press. But when she went to investigate, she instead found the dismembered torso of an adult woman.

Also last year, a psychic appeared to have predicted the location of the victims of what police believed to a serial killer on Long Island, the New York Post said. The psychic said that a body would be found buried in a place looking over the water and there would be a "G" on a sign nearby. In December 2010 investigators uncovered the remains of several victims on Long Island's Giglo Beach -- but none were buried.

Still, in a telephone interview with ABC News, the owners of the Texas property surrounded by police Tuesday appeared amused by the unwarranted spectacle. They had been out of town when the authorities descended on their home.

When told a psychic had started it all, they just laughed.

A spokesperson for the Liberty County Sheriff's Office did not return requests for comment on this report.

ABC News' Richard Esposito contributed to this report.

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