ABC News
  • Blood Diamonds

    Campbell had another of her infamous outbursts of anger when asked about allegations that she had received a "blood diamond" from deposed African despot Charles Taylor. "I didn't receive a diamond and I'm not going to speak about that," Campbell told ABC News in an interview during Fashion Week. Campbell walked out of the interview and punched the camera of an ABC News producer. She would not answer questions about her alleged refusal to cooperate with the international criminal tribunal now prosecuting Taylor. Her London-based lawyer also declined to comment.
    ABC News
  • Blood Diamonds

    Naomi Campbell walked out of an interview and punched the camera of an ABC News producer when asked about allegations she had received a blood diamond. The photo here shows the moment of impact, before the camera screen went blue. Campbell has been in legal trouble for prior outbursts. In 2007, she pleaded guilty to assaulting her housekeeper in New York, and in 2008, she pleaded guilty to assaulting a police constable in the U.K.
    ABC News
  • Blood Diamonds

    In September 1997, Taylor traveled to South Africa and stayed five days. Taylor is pictured here with Naomi Campbell at a dinner with South African president Nelson Mandela.
    Mia Farrow
  • Blood Diamonds

    In his presidential papers, Taylor mentions meeting Nelson Mandela, actress Mia Farrow, Naomi Campbell, cricket star Imran Khan and famed music producer Quincy Jones at the dinner at Mandela's house. All but Farrow are seen here in a wider version of the previous photo. According to Farrow, Mandela's girlfriend Graca Machel, now his wife, expressed her unhappiness that Taylor was present.
    Mia Farrow
  • Blood Diamonds

    Actress Mia Farrow says that the morning after a 1997 group dinner with Naomi Campbell and Nelson Mandela, among others, Campbell told her that Liberian President Charles Taylor had sent men to her room with a present – a "huge" uncut diamond. Taylor is presently on trial at an international court in the Netherlands for war crimes, and accusations against him include using "blood diamonds" to pay for weapons to fund violence by rebels in Sierra Leone. Farrow told prosecutor Nicholas Koumjian about what she says Campbell told her about a diamond when Koumjian called to ask Farrow about the dinner. Prosecutors believe Taylor may have purchased weapons with "blood diamonds" while in South Africa.
    ABC News
  • Blood Diamonds

    In 1984, Charles Taylor was arrested in Massachusetts on a warrant for extradition to Liberia for allegedly embezzling nearly a million dollars from the Liberian government. Taylor escaped from a Massachusetts jail with four other inmates after sawing through a bar in a laundry room. The other escapees were recaptured, but Taylor successfully fled the U.S.
    Plymouth County Sheriff's Department
  • Blood Diamonds

    Sierra Leone's main rebel group, the Revolutionary United Front, made amputation of limbs its trademark during its 11-year war against the country's central government. Alusine Conteh, seen here, testified at the International Criminal Court in the Hague about the loss of his limbs. The rebels first chopped off Conteh's right hand. When they threatened to chop off the hand of his whimpering four-year-old son, he offered his own left hand instead, which they accepted. His son is now in his late teens and has to help Conteh dress, beg for alms and even relieve himself.
    Courtesy Special Court for Sierra Leone
  • Blood Diamonds

    Taylor was in exile in Nigeria from 2003 to 2006, when he was extradited by the new civilian government in Liberia. After arriving in Liberia, he was arrested by Liberian police and handed over to Irish soldiers working for the United Nations. The UN flew him by helicopter to Sierra Leone. In June 2006 he was transferred to the Netherlands, where he remains in custody.
    United Nations
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