Philadelphia Cream Cheese and 9 Other Companies Rebranding

PHOTO: Philadelphia Cream Cheese Spreads now have more fruits and vegetables in their most popular flavors.
Philadelphia Cream Cheese/PR NEWSWIRE/AP Photo

Start spreading the news. Kraft's Philadelphia Cream Cheese announced today that it is adding more fruits and vegetables to its cream cheese brand. The 140-year-old company says it's adding more real fruits and vegetables to its many flavors.

Here's more about Philadelphia Cream Cheese and other brands that have tried to revamp their images to recapture consumers' hearts.

PHOTO: Philadelphia Cream Cheese Spreads now have more fruits and vegetables in their most popular flavors.
Philadelphia Cream Cheese/PR NEWSWIRE/AP Photo
1.
Philadelphia Cream Cheese

With the announcement, now 22 of Philadelphia Cream Cheese spreads, such as Strawberry, Garden Vegetable, and Chive & Onion, have "no artificial flavors," the company said. The eight-ounce containers now have a new look and stackable shape that prevent the product from shifting on store shelves, the company said.

In a statement explaining the shift, the company said "American families are paying closer attention to what they eat and increasingly seeking out more recognizable ingredients."

PHOTO: The Amazon homepage appears on a screen in Washington, Sept. 3, 2010.
Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images
2.
Amazon

Amazon used to be known for ordering hardcover and paperback books, eventually electronics and now a one-stop shop for almost anything in the world. The company may have been late to the music streaming business, but they have entered the video and e-book business in full force. Following the heels of the successful Kindle reader, the company introduced today a set-top entertainment streaming box Amazon Fire TV.

Users will be able to watch content from Amazon, Hulu, Netflix, YouTube and ESPN on the device.

Read More: Living Room Wars: Amazon Fights for Your TV

PHOTO: Belmonds newly redesigned website.
Belmond
3.
Belmond

Starting March 10, 30-year-old Orient-Express Hotels Ltd. began running its luxury travel experiences and 45 hotels under the new brand name, Belmond. The company, whose old name referred to train services in Europe, said the launch of the new name "is expected to heighten awareness" of the company's hotels, safaris and river cruises.

The company's new name, Belmond, comes from the phrase "beautiful world" in French, or the combination of "belle" and "monde."

In Photos: Travel Across Europe in Luxury Trains

PHOTO: Hostess snacks, made by Interstate Brands, is viewed in Washington, Jan. 11, 2012.
Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images
4.
Hostess

After a well-publicized union dispute, subsequent bankruptcy and store run on Twinkies, popular Hostess products returned to store shelves last summer with a new look, but same taste. Also returning were CupCakes, Donettes, Zingers, HoHos and Ding Dongs.

Twinkies raised eyebrows initially because of a longer shelf life for the snack, but the company said the formula had been in the works before it was taken private by investment firms.

Read More: Shelves Stocked for Twinkies' 'Sweetest Comeback'

PHOTO: Outside Event sign for the 2011 Hooters Calendar Girls signing at Hooters on October 6, 2010 in New York City.
Marc Stamas/Getty Images
5.
Hooters

Hooters "breastaurants" have entertained and fed customers since the first store opened in Clearwater, Fla., in 1983. But with revenue dipping, Hooters of America Restaurant Group LLC announced in the summer of 2012 a three- to five-year revitalization plan, with a new restaurant look, menu and attempts to attract a female clientele.

The privately held restaurant chain, based in Atlanta, operates or franchises more than 430 Hooters locations in 27 countries.

The company is famous for its Hooters Girls, shapely female workers in white tank tops and short orange shirts. The company employs more than 25,000 people, including 17,000 Hooters Girls, according to its website. But the company said Hooters is more than that.

The company introduced a television campaign and menu, with almost 30 salads, burgers and more chicken wings, and 25 remodeled locations.

PHOTO: J.C. Penny store
Mary Altaffer/AP Photo
6.
J.C. Penney

Back in 2012, J.C. Penney introduced a new pricing strategy and image. J.C. Penney's "Fair and Square" pricing strategy launched in February 2012, hoping to lure customers with everyday low pricing year-round and "month-long values" on specific items, as opposed to sales and print coupons.

The strategy flopped, sales dropped and Johnson was eventually booted out of the company a year ago.

PHOTO: Richard Schulze, founder of Best Buy, speaks during the Starkey Foundation Gala 2005 at River Centre in St. Paul, Minnesota, Aug. 20, 2005.
Adam Bettcher/WireImage/Getty Images
7.
Best Buy

Best Buy founder and former CEO Richard Schulze failed to take the company private in 2012 amid struggling sales.

The company has closed dozens of stores at the time and shrunk some existing stores' square footage. Increasing numbers of customers have been "showrooming," going to Best Buy to look products over -- and then buying them more cheaply online, analysts have said.

The company has responded with price-matching programs and emphasizing in-store customer service experiences.

8.
Dollar Tree

Dollar Tree, Inc. and its dollar store national competitors, like Dollar General, owned by Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway, have tried to revamp their images. No more, they hope, of the shoddy storefronts most people have visited, threatening low-cost ultra-competitor Walmart.

Stock in Dollar Tree, based in Chesapeake, Va., had quadrupled over the last few years, as Dollar Tree stores add more expensive items such as electric appliances.

PHOTO: A McDonald's Big Mac value meal a arranged in New York on July 23, 2010.
Jin Lee/Bloomberg/Getty Images
9.
McDonald's

Casual chain restaurants typically have a major push to renovate stores every seven years or so. Making themselves look more appealing is key to increasing foot traffic, which of course, is critical to increase sales.

Over the last few years, McDonald's has emphasized healthy eating options, including salads for adults and apples instead of French fries for kids. Remodeled restaurants include free Wi-Fi and sleeker interiors.

The company has also introduced a plethora of coffee options and other beverages for adults.

PHOTO: Patrons enter the Outback Steakhouse in in Chicago, Ill.
Joshua Lott/Bloomberg/Getty Images
10.
Outback Steakhouse

Bloomin' Brands, which owns Outback Steakhouse and Bonefish Grill, among other properties, went public on Aug. 8, 2012, and shares have remained steady around $25 as of late.

The company opened the first Outback Steakhouse restaurant in 1988 in Tampa, Fla. Last month, the company announced a secondary offering of 19 million shares priced at $24.50.

With the new cash, we may see revamped locations and maybe even more fantastic Bloomin' Onions at Bloomin' Brands' more than 1,400 restaurants.

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