Silicon Insider: Should Drudge and Huffington Get Pulitzers?

The single most worthy recipient of a Pulitzer this year is Michael Yon (with fellow Middle East blogger Michael Totten a close second). Yon's reporting from Iraq is so superior to anything being done in the mainstream media that those other reporters should hang their heads and go home. But Yon doesn't work for a newspaper, he survives instead on donations from readers, so he probably isn't even eligible.

By the same token, the Pulitzer for commentary will probably go to some codger at the Detroit Free Press, when it should probably go to someone who is actually clever, influential and widely read, like Mickey Kaus at Slate.com. And how about Terry Teachout (AboutLastNight) for cultural criticism? And instead of handing a disguised (as "editorial writing" or some other cover) lifetime achievement award to yet one more doddering old nostalgia merchant, how about awarding it to someone who actually has transformed the journalism world in the last decade: like Arianna Huffington or Roger L. Simon, Glenn Reynolds or Markos (Kos) Moulitsas? Or better yet, how about Matt Drudge, who is secretly read by every reporter in the world?

But if you think that's going to happen, you are still living, like the newspaper world, in 1998, or 1898. The Pulitzer Prizes are for newspaper reporting -- meaning print, with a quick head-nod toward newspaper Web sites. Not for the far bigger, more demanding and more influential world of independent online journalism.

Perhaps somebody should send a copy of that InfoCom report to the Pulitzer selection committee.

TAD'S TAB: If you're looking for something to keep you up at night, or at least to freak you out momentarily, visit http://cubo.cc/. There you will find a tranquil but disturbing looking woman whose bloodshot eyes will track the movement of your mouse. One of the links from the site will lead you to a Web site that sells chocolates shaped like human limbs. There are a lot of strange and mysterious websites out there, and this one is right up there.

This is the opinion of the columnist, and in no way reflects the opinion of ABC News.

Michael S. Malone is one of the nation's best-known technology writers. He has covered Silicon Valley and high-tech for more than 25 years, beginning with the San Jose Mercury News, as the nation's first daily high-tech reporter. His articles and editorials have appeared in such publications as The Wall Street Journal, the Economist and Fortune, and for two years he was a columnist for The New York Times. He was editor of Forbes ASAP, the world's largest-circulation business-tech magazine, at the height of the dot-com boom. Malone is the author or co-author of a dozen books, notably the best-selling "Virtual Corporation." Malone has also hosted three public television interview series, and most recently co-produced the celebrated PBS miniseries on social entrepreneurs, "The New Heroes." He has been the ABCNEWS.com Silicon Insider columnist since 2000.

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