Defining America's New Face of Poverty

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Demand has increased so rapidly that almost half of the food pantries and soup kitchens in the area have been forced to turn people away due to lack of food. The crisis of the food network comes at time when 40 percent of New Yorkers have problems affording food. "Even people who are working are experiencing difficulty affording food at close to the same rate as the unemployed," Stampas said. "It speaks to the fact that many people that are working are not working the kind of hours they need to feed their families, they're not earning wages to afford food, and employment is not a guarantee against hunger."

Wish Upon a Hero

The new face can come cloaked in anonymity. In some cases, seeking help on anonymous message boards or sharing their story on Youtube hidden behind blurred lines.

These financial difficulties are familiar to a Lexington, North Carolina, resident, whose husband was laid off in May, leaving the family of five in a crunch when it came to bare necessities. The mother of three who adopted children posted an anonymous note on "Wish Upon a Hero" asking not for money or clothes but food.

"We are in need of some food. We do get adoption assistance but isn't enough to buy food and it barely covers our food. I'm not asking for money really, a gift card for any food store would be great. Walmart, Food Lion or anything anyone can do to help would be great."

"I have a strong belief in God," says Block. "I don't believe God is up there with a spread sheet saying 'you're all tapped out.' I don't know where I would be without this."

Demand has increased so rapidly that almost half of the food pantries and soup kitchens in the area have been forced to turn people away due to lack of food. The crisis of the food network comes at time when 40 percent of New Yorkers have problems affording food. "Even people who are working are experiencing difficulty affording food at close to the same rate as the unemployed," Stampas said. "It speaks to the fact that many people that are working are not working the kind of hours they need to feed their families, they're not earning wages to afford food, and employment is not a guarantee against hunger."

Wish Upon a Hero

The new face can come cloaked in anonymity. In some cases, seeking help on anonymous message boards or sharing their story on Youtube hidden behind blurred lines.

These financial difficulties are familiar to a Lexington, North Carolina, resident, whose husband was laid off in May, leaving the family of five in a crunch when it came to bare necessities. The mother of three who adopted children posted an anonymous note on "Wish Upon a Hero" asking not for money or clothes but food.

"We are in need of some food. We do get adoption assistance but isn't enough to buy food and it barely covers our food. I'm not asking for money really, a gift card for any food store would be great. Walmart, Food Lion or anything anyone can do to help would be great."

"I have a strong belief in God," says Block. "I don't believe God is up there with a spread sheet saying 'you're all tapped out.' I don't know where I would be without this."

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