'Made in America' High Fashion Easy to Find at Fashion Week

"Women love that. I think customers are proud to wear things and are happy to spend money on supporting this economy, especially after all these years of seeing manufacturing diminish," she said.

Designers like Nanette Lepore, whose spring presentation attracted hundreds of clamoring fans on Wednesday, have become politically active in lobbying to protect U.S. manufacturing jobs. Lepore has even helped organize rallies in support of New York's Garment District.

Melissa Hall, who is behind the website TheEmergingDesigner.com, said new designers want to produce in the U.S. for several reasons, such as being close to the design process and control quality.

"Many designers are also keen on helping to stimulate their local economy and provide jobs to factory workers," she said. "Plus, one consumer trend that is happening right now is their desire to learn about the designer's back-story to feel a connection with the brand. That's where Made in America comes in as a marketing vehicle along with being able to communicate the craftsmanship that goes into making their product."

Emily Saunders of up-and-coming label SAUNDER said she loves being able to support industry in her hometown of New York City.

"And it's important to me to have a relationship with the people who help make the clothing for my line - SAUNDER is my baby and it's nice knowing that my baby is in good hands," she said.

Marlon Gobel, behind the men's line Marlon Gobel, is another New York-based designer who takes pride in producing in the U.S. In his recent fashion show, his "We Built This City" collection was inspired by iron workers who built Manhattan in the early 20th century.

"It just makes more sense to make it here. You can control the timing of your product so much better."

In Photos: Fashion Week's First Ever Plus-Sized Show

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