New Google Zeppelin Hangar Cries Out for Zeppelin

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Probably no one in the United States knows more about building and flying zeppelins than Brian Hall, who, until recently, was CEO of Airship Ventures, a zeppelin sight-seeing company that operated out of Moffett Field.

If you're going to spend $45 million to spruce up Hangar One, asks Hall, why not toss in another $50 million and get yourself a nice new zeppelin? Call it "GoogleZep."

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By Hall's calculations, Google could build a craft as big as the Macon for $50 million. (Getting it certified by the FAA, he notes, would be another costly matter.)

The possibilities for what Google could do with GoogleZep are endless.

The Akron, the Macon's sister-ship, once carried 200 passengers. If GoogleZep could accommodate that many, they'd have plenty of room onboard to roam around and to stretch out.

GoogleZep could be an airborne conference center or a flying hotel. It could be a showroom for new Google gadgets -- an aerial cousin to the Google barge.

If used for data storage and transmission, it would give a new meaning to the term "cloud computing."

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