How Lottery Winners Spend Their Money

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The holder of the winning ticket is not the only one fate favors when someone wins the lottery: The merchant who sold the ticket also cashes in.

In 2011, a supermarket customer on Long Island won $72 million from the New York State Lottery. The winning ticket was sold him at a ShopRite owned by Mannix Family Supermarkets. Kevin Mannix, owner of the company, tells ABC News that he got $10,000 from lottery officials for having sold the winning ticket.

"Yes, I'm sitting in my office looking at an enlargement of the check right now," Mannix tells ABC. He donated part of his winnings, he says, to the Salvation Army, some to the Food Bank of New York, and some to Project Hospitality, which is providing relief for victims of Hurricane Sandy. "That was the appropriate thing to do," he says. After that, he had exactly $1 left over, which he used to play the lottery.

He didn't win.

Mannix's ShopRite has been lucky once before. Six years ago, a group of 10 bakery employees split a $19 million ticket. Nine of them, says Mannix, decided to keep working and are still on the job. None went wacky or became a drunk or wound up in jail. Some, he says, "bought their dream house." Others salted away the money, to be used later to pay for college for their grandkids. Some paid off mortgages. A few took trips. "They didn't spend foolishly," says their boss. "They're hardworking, blue collar people. It's a great story with a great ending."

There are sad stories as well. On Monday, DeeDee Moore, the Tampa woman accused of swindling and then killing lottery winner Abraham Shakespeare, was found guilty of first degree murder and other charges. Shakespeare had won $30 million in the Florida Lottery but gave it away to people who simply asked for it. His luck ran out when he met Moore.

"Abraham Shakespeare was your prey and victim. Money was the route of evil you brought to Abraham. You are sentenced to life in prison you shall not be elegible for parole," Judge Emmet Battles told Moore. You can read more about this story here.

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