Adele Proves Yet Again Why She's Retro Chic

PHOTO: Adele arrives at the Oscars at Hollywood & Highland Center, Feb. 24, 2013 in Hollywood, California.PlayJason Merritt/Getty Images
WATCH Adele Breaks Records with Historic Album Debut of '25'

Adele is one singer who doesn't get swayed by the changing times.

The British singer revealed in the March issue of Vogue that she penned the lyrics to "25" the old school way -- in a notebook.

The 27-year-old singer said she even surprised herself when she began writing her latest album with a Sharpie pen in a notebook.

"I was just shocked that all of a sudden I was 25!" she told the magazine. "But actually I like myself more than ever. I feel so comfortable in my own skin. I really like how I look, I like who I am, I like everyone that I surround myself with."

It's not the first time Adele has seemingly reached back in time. Here are other ways Adele has made being retro cool:

Remember That Flip Phone in the Music Video for "Hello"?

Adele debuted "Hello" with a black and white music video. In the video, not only is Adele cleaning an old house, she's also seen boiling a pot of water on the stove...and not with a Keurig?! But what really took fans by surprise was that Adele used a flip phone in the video in the age of smartphones. It didn't help that the lyrics to "Hello" sound as if Adele is leaving a voicemail. And who does that nowadays?

Adele Made Winged Eyeliner and Bouffants Cool Again

It's become her signature style: big hair and black, thick eyeliner. Adele's look dates all the way back to the 1950s and 60s when big teased hair was in style. During the same decade, actress Elizabeth Taylor helped usher in the thick eyeliner trend thanks to her role in the 1963 film "Cleopatra." Although her look has evolved slightly -- Adele is sporting a new straight bob now -- the singer is still giving us amazing cat-eyeliner.

Adele Refuses to Allow Streaming Sites to Play Her Music

When Adele released "25" last November, fans were saddened to discover they couldn't stream the 11 new tracks on music streaming sites. But if the singer had it her way, music lovers would continue to hit up brick-and-mortar stores to get her music.

"I don't use streaming. I buy my music. I download it, and I buy a physical [copy] just to make up for the fact that someone else somewhere isn't," she told Time magazine last December. "I know that streaming music is the future, but it's not the only way to consume music."