Eva Longoria on Leaving 'Desperate Housewives,' Her Divorce and New Job With President Obama

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Eva Longoria Goes Back to School for Next Venture

Longoria is taking a break from acting to get involved in politics. After playing an affluent Latino on television, she is taking on a new role as national co-chair of President Obama's re-election campaign. To prepare, the self-described "overachiever" has gone back to school to get a master's degree in Mexican-American studies.

"I'm excited. It's probably the most fulfilling thing that I've done in the past two years," she said. "I needed to be literate about the topics I'm talking about. ... If you're only superficially commenting on the things that you really don't know about, it's dangerous and so I didn't want to contribute to that dialogue. I wanted to be a little more literate and articulate about it."

A ninth-generation Mexican-American and Texas native who honed her political skills on Wisteria Lane, Longoria is ready for a change but it sounds as if she will desperately miss aspects of "Housewives."

"I'm going to really have withdrawals from the other girls, spending so much time with them and not being able to see them every day. I think that's going to hit me. Not yet, but it will," she said. "And the crew."

To Longoria, the series should be remembered as one that blazed a trail with four strong women leading the pack and breaking stereotypes.

"We'll never have this dynamic again. I know it. We'll never have this perfect chemistry" she said. "It was just great to go to work every day."

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