Gia Allemand Laid To Rest at NYC Funeral

PHOTO: Boyfriend, Ryan Anderson, and the mother of former "Bachelor" contestant, Gia Allemand, attend the funeral for Gia Allemand at Trinity Grace Church on Aug. 22, 2013 in New York City.
Share
Copy

Friends and family were able to celebrate the life of Gia Allemand and say goodbye to the reality star during a public funeral service at Trinity Grace Church in New York City on Thursday.

According to a statement from the former "Bachelor" contestant's rep, the funeral was open "with the intention to welcome family and friends from near and far."

Allemand, 29, attempted suicide last Monday and died two days later when she was taken off life support.

Read: Disturbing New Details on Gia Allemand Death

The funeral began when a car carrying the coffin and boasting a pink and yellow floral sign that read "GIA" pulled up to the church.

Among those in attendance were Allemand's boyfriend, Ryan Anderson; her mother, Donna Micheletti; and father Eugene Allemand, People magazine reports.

According to the magazine, the service was less than an hour long, featuring "Amazing Grace," Allemand's favorite hymn, and two close friends offered eulogies.

One of the speakers said she was Allemand's best friend since they were 3 years old. She spoke of Gia's inclination to give to others.

Related: The 'Bachelor' Community Reacts to Gia Allemand's Death

The service program read, "The family of Gia Allemand wishes to express their sincerest gratitude to all those, near and far, who have extended words of encouragement and support during this time of incredible loss."

Join the Discussion
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
PHOTO: Patrick Crawford is pictured in this photo from his Facebook page.
Meteorologist Patrick Crawford KCEN/Facebook
Kate Middleton Learns Sign Language
Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images
PHOTO: George Stinney Jr., the youngest person ever executed in South Carolina, in 1944, is seen in this undated file photo.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History/AP Photo
PHOTO: Johns Hopkins University sent nearly 300 acceptance emails to students who had actually been denied.
Kim Hairston/Baltimore Sun/Getty Images